Etymology
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invest (v.)

late 14c., "to clothe in the official robes of an office," from Latin investire "to clothe in, cover, surround," from in "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + vestire "to dress, clothe," from PIE *wes- (2) "to clothe," extended form of root *eu- "to dress."

The meaning "use money to produce profit" is attested from 1610s in connection with the East Indies trade, and it is probably a borrowing of a special use of Italian investire (13c., from the same Latin root) via the notion of giving one's capital a new form. The figurative sense of "to clothe (with attributes)" is from c. 1600. The military meaning "to besiege, surround with hostile intent" also is from c. 1600. Related: Invested; investing.

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investor (n.)
1580s, "one who clothes;" 1862, "one who invests money," agent noun from invest.
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investment (n.)
1590s, "act of putting on vestments" (a sense now found in investiture); later "act of being invested with an office, right, endowment, etc." (1640s); and "surrounding and besieging" of a military target (1811); from invest + -ment.

Commercial sense of "an investing of money or capital" is from 1610s, originally in reference to the East India Company; general use is from 1740 in the sense of "conversion of money to property in hopes of profit," and by 1837 in the sense "amount of money invested." For evolution of the commercial senses, see invest.
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reinvest (v.)

also re-invest, "invest with," in any sense; 1610s of vestments or garments; by 1848 of money; from re- "back, again" + invest (v.)). Related: Reinvested; reinvesting; reinvestment.

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investiture (n.)
late 14c., "ceremony of clothing in the insignia of office," from Medieval Latin investitura "an investing," from past participle stem of Latin investire "to clothe" (see invest). Related: Investive.
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*eu- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to dress," with extended form *wes- (2) "to clothe."

It forms all or part of: divest; exuviae; invest; revetment; transvestite; travesty; vest; vestry; wear.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Hittite washshush "garments," washanzi "they dress;" Sanskrit vaste "he puts on," vasanam "garment;" Avestan vah-; Greek esthes "clothing," hennymi "to clothe," eima "garment;" Latin vestire "to clothe;" Welsh gwisgo, Breton gwiska; Old English werian "to clothe, put on, cover up," wæstling "sheet, blanket."
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anthropomorphize (v.)
"to invest with human qualities," 1834; see anthropomorphous + -ize. Related: Anthropomorphized; anthopomorphizing.
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embody (v.)

1540s, in reference to a soul or spirit, "invest with an animate form;" from 1660s of principles, ideas, etc., "express, arrange or exemplify intelligently or perceptibly;" from em- (1) "in" + body (n.). Related: Embodied; embodying.

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nationalize (v.)

1794, "invest with a national character;" see national + -ize. Probably inspired by French nationaliser, noted by 1795 as one of the coinages of the Revolution. Meaning "bring under state control" is from 1869. Related: Nationalized; nationalizing.

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privilege (v.)

late 14c., privilegen, "endow (someone) with a special right, grace, power, etc.; to invest with a privilege," from privilege (n.) and from Old French privilegier (13c.), from Medieval Latin privilegare, from Latin privilegium "law applying to one person." Related: Privileged; privileging.

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