Etymology
Advertisement
inure (v.)
formerly also enure, mid-15c., "accustom, adapt, establish by use," contracted from phrase (put) in ure "in practice" (early 15c.), from obsolete noun ure "work, practice, exercise, use," probably from Old French uevre, oeuvre "work," from Latin opera "work" (from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance"). Meaning "toughen or harden by experience" is from late 15c. Related: Inured; inuring.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
acclimatize (v.)

1824, "modify a living thing to suit a foreign climate" (transitive); see acclimate + -ize. A more recent formation than acclimate and generally replacing it in this sense. Related: Acclimatized; acclimatizing. Simple climatize is attested from 1826 as "inure (a living thing) to a climate."

Related entries & more