Etymology
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intransitive (adj.)
1610s, from Late Latin intransitivus "not transitive, not passing over" (to another person), Priscian's term, from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Latin transitivus "that may pass over," from transire "to pass over" (see transitive). The noun meaning "an intransitive verb" is attested from 1824.
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steady (v.)
1520s, transitive and intransitive, from steady (adj.). Related: Steadied; steadying.
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fragment (v.)
by 1788 (implied in fragmented), from fragment (n.). Intransitive use from 1961. Related: Fragmenting.
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swivel (v.)
1794 (transitive), from swivel (n.). Intransitive use from 1846. Related: Swiveled; swiveling; swivelled; swivelling.
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towel (v.)
1836 (transitive); 1861 (intransitive), from towel (n.). Related: Towelled; towelling.
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function (v.)

1844, "perform a function" (intransitive), from function (n.). Related: Functioned; functioning.

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kink (v.)
1690s (intransitive), 1800 (transitive), from kink (n.). Related: Kinked; kinking.
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uncurl (v.)
1580s, intransitive; 1590s, transitive," from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + curl (v.).
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spangle (v.)
1540s, "cover with spangles," from spangle (n.). Intransitive meaning "glitter, glisten" is from 1630s. Related: Spangled; spangling.
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