Etymology
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intoxicate (v.)
mid-15c., "to poison" (obsolete), from Medieval Latin intoxicatus, past participle of intoxicare "to poison," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + Latin toxicare "to poison," from toxicum "poison" (see toxic). Meaning "make drunk" first recorded 1570s (implied in intoxicated). Figurative sense "excite to a high pitch of feeling" is attested from 1590s. Related: Intoxicating.
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intoxicated (adj.)
1550s, "poisoned;" 1570s, "drunk," past-participle adjective from intoxicate (v.).
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intoxicant (n.)
"that which intoxicates," 1798; see intoxicate. Perhaps from Medieval Latin intoxicantem (nominative intoxicans), present participle of intoxicare. As an adjective from 1882.
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intoxication (n.)
c. 1400, intoxigacion "poisoning, administration of poison," from Medieval Latin intoxicationem (nominative intoxicatio) "a poisoning," noun of action from past participle stem of intoxicare "to poison" (see intoxicate). Meaning "state of inebriation" is from 1640s.
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wet (v.)
Old English wætan "to wet, moisten, water; be or become wet;" see wet (adj.). From mid-15c. as "to intoxicate" (oneself). Meaning "urinate" is by 1925. Related: Wetted; wetting.
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katzenjammer (n.)

1821, in a German context, "a hangover," American English colloquial, from German Katzenjammer "hangover" (18c.), also figuratively, in colloquial use, "remorse of conscience, vow to mend one's ways," literally "wailing of cats, misery of cats," from katzen, combining form of katze "cat" (see cat (n.)) + jammer "distress, wailing" (see yammer (v.)).

Pleasure can intoxicate, passion can inebriate, success can make you quite as drunk as champagne. The waking from these several stages of delights will bring the same result--Katzenjammer. In English you would call it reaction; but whole pages of English cannot express the sick, empty, weary, vacant feeling which is so concisely contained within these four German syllables. ["Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine," August 1884]

Katzenjammer Kids "spectacularly naughty children" is from the title of the popular newspaper comic strip (based on the German Max und Moritz stories) first drawn by German-born U.S. comic strip artist Rudolph Dirks (1877-1968) in 1897 for the "New York Journal." Hence, katzenjammer in the sense "any unpleasant reaction" (1897). The strip was temporarily de-Germanized during World War I:

"THE SHENANIGAN KIDS" is the new American name for the original "Katzenjammer Kids." Although the original name and idea were pure Holland Dutch, some people may have had the mistaken impression that they were of Germanic origin, and hence the change. It is the same splendid comic as in the past. [International Feature Service advertisement in "Editor & Publisher," July 6, 1918]
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