Etymology
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intolerable (adj.)
late 14c., from Latin intolerabilis "that cannot bear; that cannot be borne," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + tolerabilis "that may be endured," from tolerare "to bear, endure" (see toleration). Related: Intolerably.
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intolerability (n.)
1590s, from intolerable + -ity or else from Late Latin intolerabilitas, from Latin intolerabilis "that cannot bear; that cannot be borne." Slightly earlier in the same sense was intolerableness.
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insufferable (adj.)
"intolerable, not to be endured," early 15c., from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + sufferable. Related: Insufferably.
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intolerant (adj.)
1735, "unable or unwilling to endure" (a condition, etc.), from Latin intolerantem (nominative intolerans) "not enduring, impatient, intolerant; intolerable," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + tolerans, present participle of tolerare "to bear, endure" (see toleration).

Meaning "not disposed to endure contrary opinions or beliefs, impatient of dissent or opposition" is from 1765. Of plants, with reference to deep shade, from 1898. The noun meaning "person or persons who do not favor toleration" is from 1765. Related: Intolerantly.
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paradisiacal (adj.)

"pertaining to or relating to paradise or a place or state resembling it," 1630s, from Latin paradisiacus (from Greek paradeisiakos, from paradeisos; see paradise) + -al (1).

paradise rivals NECTAR in the number of experiments that the desire for a satisfactory adjective has occasioned. But, whereas nectar is in the end well enough provided, no-one uses any adjective from paradise without feeling that surely some other would have been less inadequate. The variants are paradisaic*(al*), paradisal, paradisean, paradisiac(al), paradisial*, paradisian*, paradisic(al), of which the asterisked ones are badly formed. Paradisal is perhaps the least intolerable, & that perhaps because it retains the sound of the last syllable of paradise; but the wise man takes refuge with heavenly, Edenlike, or other substitute. [Fowler] 
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outstrip (v.)

1570s, "to pass in running," originally in Lyly, perhaps from out- + Middle English strip "move quickly, make a stroke" (in reference to a weapon). c. 1400, a word of uncertain origin, perhaps from stripe (n.). Or outstrip might be a corruption of outstrike (15c.), from strike (v.) in the old sense of "go, proceed, advance." The figurative sense of "to excel or surpass in anything" is from 1590s. Related: Outstripped; outstripping. The punning references to strip (v.) date from late 19c.

The abridged petticoats of the ladies proceeded, no doubt, to an intolerable pitch; and they tried, as Byron said, to outstrip one another. [W. Carew Hazlitt, "Four Generations of a Literary Family," 1897, referring to Henry James Byron, the dramatist and the author's friend, not Lord Byron, the poet]
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condemn (v.)

early 14c., condempnen "to blame, censure;" mid-14c., "pronounce judgment against," from Old French condamner, condemner "to condemn" (11c.) and directly from Latin condemnare, condempnare "to sentence, doom, blame, disapprove," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + damnare "to harm, damage" (see damn (v.)). Replaced Old English fordeman.

From late 14c. as "hold to be reprehensible or intolerable," also "afford occasion for condemnation, bear witness against." From 1705 as "adjudge or pronounce as forfeited" (as a prize of war, etc.); from 1833, American English, in the sense of "to judicially take (land, etc.) for potential public use." From 1745 as "judge or pronounce (a building, etc.) to be unfit for use or service." Related: Condemned; condemning.

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