Etymology
Advertisement
violence (n.)

late 13c., "physical force used to inflict injury or damage," from Anglo-French and Old French violence (13c.), from Latin violentia "vehemence, impetuosity," from violentus "vehement, forcible," probably related to violare (see violation). Weakened sense of "improper treatment" is attested from 1590s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
intimate (adj.)

1630s, "closely acquainted, very familiar," also "inmost, intrinsic," from Late Latin intimatus, past participle of intimare "make known, announce, impress," from Latin intimus "inmost, innermost, deepest" (adj.), also used figuratively, of affections, feelings, as a noun, "close friend;" superlative of in "in" (from PIE root *en "in"). Intimate (adj.) used euphemistically in reference to women's underwear from 1904. Related: Intimately.

Related entries & more 
partner (n.)

c. 1300, partiner, "a sharer or partaker in anything," altered from parcener (late 13c.), from Old French parçonier "partner, associate; joint owner, joint heir," from parçon "partition, division. portion, share, lot," from Latin partitionem (nominative partitio) "a sharing, partition, division, distribution" from past participle stem of partire "to part, divide" (from pars "a part, piece, a share," from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot").

The form in English has been influenced by part (n.). The word also may represent Old French part tenour "part holder." From late 14c. as "one who shares power or authority with another;" the commercial sense is by 1520s. Meaning "a husband or wife, one associated in marriage with another" is from 1749.

Related entries & more 
intimate (v.)

1530s, "make known formally;" 1580s, "suggest indirectly," back-formation from intimation (which could explain the pronunciation) or else from Late Latin intimatus, past participle of intimare "to make known." The Old French verb was intimer. Related: Intimated; intimating.

Related entries & more 
partner (v.)

1610s, transitive, "to make a partner," from partner (n.). Intransitive sense, "join one another in partnership," is by 1961. Related: Partnered; partnering.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
intimate (n.)

1650s, "familiar friend, person with whom one is intimate," from intimate (adj.). Sometimes 17c.-19c. in false Spanish form intimado. Latin intimus had a similar noun sense. Intimates as a commercial euphemism for "women's underwear" is from 1988.

Related entries & more 
non-violence (n.)

also nonviolence, 1831, from non- + violence. Gandhi used it from 1920.

Related entries & more 
polyamorous (adj.)

"desiring or having consensual intimate relations with more than one partner," by 1972, from poly- + amorous. Related: Polyamory.

Related entries & more 
partnership (n.)

1570s, "state or condition of being a partner," from partner (n.) + -ship. In the commercial sense, "association of two or more persons for carrying on a business," from c. 1700.

Related entries & more 
intercommunion (n.)

1749, "intimate intercourse, fellowship," from inter- "between" + communion (n.).

Related entries & more