Etymology
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intestines (n.)
"bowels," 1590s, from intestine, based on Latin intestina, neuter plural of intestinus (adj.) "internal, inward, intestine," from intus "within, on the inside," from PIE *entos, suffixed form of root *en "in" (see in (adv.)). Compare Sanskrit antastyam, Greek entosthia "bowels." The Old English word was hropp, literally "rope."
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enteric (adj.)
"pertaining to the intestines," 1822, from Latinized form of Greek enterikos "intestinal," first used in this sense by Aristotle, from entera (plural; singular enteron) "intestines," from PIE *enter-, comparative of root *en "in."
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catgut (n.)

"dried, twisted intestines used for strings of musical instruments," 1590s, perhaps altered from *kitgut, and from obsolete kit (n.2) "fiddle" + gut (n.). It was made from the intestines of sheep, not cats.

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rotavirus (n.)
wheel-shaped virus causing inflammation of the lining of the intestines, 1974, from Latin rota "wheel" (see rotary) + virus.
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ileum (n.)
lowest part of the small intestine, 1680s, medical Latin, from ileum, in medieval medicine "the part of the small intestines in the region of the flank," singular created from Latin ilia (pl.) "groin, flank," in classical Latin, "belly, the abdomen below the ribs," poetically, "entrails, guts." The word apparently was confused in Latin with Greek eileos "colic" (see ileus), or perhaps is a borrowing of it. The sense is "winding, turning," either via the Greek meaning or from the convolutions of the intestines. Earlier in English ylioun (late 14c.), from Medieval Latin ileon. Related: Ileitis; ileal.
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mundungus (n.)
"tobacco with an offensive odor," 1640s, from Spanish mondongo "paunch, tripe, intestines," related to modejo "paunch, belly (of a pig)."
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pylorus (n.)

"orifice of communication between the stomach and intestines," 1610s, from Late Latin pylorus "the lower orifice of the stomach," from Greek pylōros "lower orifice of the stomach," literally "gatekeeper, porter," from pylē "gate" (see pylon) + ouros "watcher, guardian" (from PIE root *wer- (3) "perceive, watch out for"). Related: Pyloric.

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tripe (n.)
c. 1300, from Old French tripe "guts, intestines, entrails used as food" (13c.), of unknown origin, perhaps via Spanish tripa from Arabic therb "suet" [Klein, Barnhart]. Applied contemptuously to persons (1590s), then to anything considered worthless, foolish, or offensive (1892).
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laxative (adj.)
late 14c., "causing relaxation or looseness," from Old French laxatif (13c.), from Medieval Latin laxativus "loosening," from Latin laxat-, past participle stem of laxare "loosen," from laxus "loose, lax" (see lax). The noun meaning "a laxative medicine, a medicine that relieves constipation by relaxing the intestines" is from late 14c.
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intestine (n.)

"lower part of the alimentary canal," early 15c., from Old French intestin (14c.) or directly from Latin intestinum "a gut," in plural (intestina), "intestines, bowels," noun use of neuter of adjective intestinus "inward, internal," from intus "within, on the inside" (from PIE *entos, suffixed form of root *en "in").

Distinction of large and small intestines in Middle English was made under the terms gross and subtle. Intestine also was used as an adjective in English 16c.-19c. with a sense (as in French) of "internal, domestic, civil."

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