Etymology
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interruption (n.)
late 14c., "a break of continuity," from Latin interruptionem (nominative interruptio) "a breaking off, interruption, interval," noun of action from past participle stem of interrumpere "to break apart, break off" (see interrupt (v.)). Meaning "a breaking in upon some action" is from c. 1400; that of "a pause, a temporary cessation" is early 15c.
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interturb (v.)
"to disturb by interruption" (obsolete), 1550s, from Latin inturbus, past participle of inturbare "disturb by interruption," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + turbare "to disturb, confuse" (see turbid). Related: Interturber (1530s).
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discontinuation (n.)

"interruption of continuity, separation of parts which form a connected series," 1610s, from French discontinuation (14c.), from Medieval Latin discontinuationem (nominative discontinuatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of discontinuare (see discontinue (v.)).

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discontinuance (n.)

"action of breaking off, intermission, interruption," late 14c., from Anglo-French discontinuance, from Old French discontinuer "to discontinue," from Medieval Latin discontinuare, from dis- "not" (see dis-) + Latin continuare "to continue" (see continue).

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cessation (n.)

mid-15c., cessacyoun "interruption, a ceasing; abdication," from Latin cessationem (nominative cessatio) "a delaying, ceasing, tarrying," noun of action from past-participle stem of cessare "to delay" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield").

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rain-out (n.)

also rain out, rainout, "cancellation or interruption of an outdoor event due to rain," 1947, from the verbal phrase; see rain (v.) + out (adv.). Of baseball games, to be rained out "cancelled because of rain" is attested from 1928.

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alternating (adj.)

1550s, "occurring or acting by turns, one after the other," present-participle adjective from alternate (v.). Electrical alternating current is recorded from 1839, an electrical current which flows alternately in opposite directions without interruption.

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abscission (n.)
Origin and meaning of abscission

"removal or cutting away," early 15c., from Latin abscissionem (nominative abscissio) "a cutting off, a breaking off, interruption," noun of action from past-participle stem of abscindere "to cut off, divide, part, separate" (see abscissa).

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resume (v.)

c. 1400, resumen, "repossess, resume possession" (of goods, money, etc.); early 15c., "regain, take back, take to oneself anew" (courage, strength, hope, etc.); from Old French resumer (14c.) and directly from Latin resumere "take again, take up again, assume again," from re- "again" (denoting "repetition of an action;" see re-) + sumere "to take, obtain, buy," from sus‑, variant of sub‑ "up from under" + emere "to take" (from PIE root *em- "to take, distribute").

From mid-15c. as "recommence, continue (a practice, custom, occupation, etc.), begin again after interruption;" also "begin again." The intransitive sense of "proceed after interruption" is from 1802. Related: Resumed; resuming.

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continuous (adj.)

"characterized by continuity, not affected by disconnection or interruption," 1640s, from French continueus or directly from Latin continuus "joining, connecting with something; following one after another," from continere (intransitive) "to be uninterrupted," literally "to hang together" (see contain). Related: Continuously; continuousness.

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