Etymology
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interrupt (n.)
"action of interrupting," 1956, originally in computing in reference to programs, from interrupt (v.).
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interrupt (v.)
c. 1400, "to interfere with a legal right," from Latin interruptus, past participle of interrumpere "break apart, break off, break through," from inter "between" (see inter-) + rumpere "to break" (see rupture (n.), and compare corrupt (adj.)). Meaning "to break into, break in upon, disturb the action of" (especially of speech) is from early 15c. in English (it is also in Latin). Related: Interrupted; interrupting.
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uninterrupted (adj.)
c. 1600, "continuous;" 1650s, "undisturbed," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of interrupt. Related: Uninterruptedly.
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interruption (n.)
late 14c., "a break of continuity," from Latin interruptionem (nominative interruptio) "a breaking off, interruption, interval," noun of action from past participle stem of interrumpere "to break apart, break off" (see interrupt (v.)). Meaning "a breaking in upon some action" is from c. 1400; that of "a pause, a temporary cessation" is early 15c.
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interpellate (v.)
1590s, "interrupt," from Latin interpellatus, past participle of interpellare "to interrupt by speaking" (see interpellation). Parliamentary sense of "question formally or publically" is from 1874, from French. Related: Interpellated; interpellating.
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intermit (v.)
1540s, "to interrupt" (obsolete); 1570s as "to discontinue for a time, suspend" (trans.) and "cease for a time" (intrans.), from Latin intermittere "to leave off, leave an interval, omit, suspend, interrupt, neglect," from inter "between" (see inter-) + mittere "to send" (see mission). Related: Intermitted; intermitting.
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intervenient (adj.)
c. 1600, from Latin intervenientem (nominative interveniens), present participle of intervenire "to come between, interrupt," from inter "between" (see inter-) + venire "to come," from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come." Related: Interveniently.
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intervent (v.)
"to come between" (obsolete), 1590s, from Latin interventus, past participle of intervenire "to come between, interrupt," from inter- "between" (see inter-) + venire "to come," from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come." Related: Intervented; interventing.
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interlocution (n.)
"interchange of speech, dialogue, action of talking and replying," 1530s, from Latin interlocutionem (nominative interlocutio) "a speaking between, interlocution," noun of action from past participle stem of interloqui "to speak between; to interrupt," from inter "between" (see inter-) + loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").
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interpellation (n.)
late 15c., "an appeal" (obsolete), from Latin interpellationem (nominative interpellatio) "an interruption," noun of action from past participle stem of interpellare "to interrupt by speaking," from inter "between" (see inter-) + pellare, collateral form of pellere "to drive" (from PIE root *pel- (5) "to thrust, strike, drive"). The parliamentary sense is attested in English from 1837, from French.
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