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interpreter (n.)
"one who translates spoken languages; a translator of written texts," late 14c., from Old French interpreteor, entrepreteur, from Late Latin interpretator "an explainer," agent noun from interpretari "explain, expound" (see interpret).
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dragoman (n.)

"an interpreter, a guide for travelers," c. 1300, drugeman, from Old French drugemen and directly from Medieval Latin dragumanus, from late Greek dragoumanos, from Arabic targuman "interpreter," from targama "interpret." Treated in English as a compound from man (n.), with plural -men.

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oneirocritic (n.)

"a judge or interpreter of dreams," 1650s from Greek oneirokritikos "of or pertaining to the interpretation of dreams," from oneirokritēs "interpreter of dreams," from oneiros "a dream" (see oneiro-) + kritēs "discerner, judge" (see critic).

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Latimer 
also Lattimore, etc., surname, c. 1200, from late Old English latimer "interpreter," from Old French latimier, corruption of latinier, from Latin latinarius "interpreter," literally "a speaker of Latin" (see Latin (n.)). The corruption was perhaps originally graphic (OED) or arose in Vulgar Latin.
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oneiromancy (n.)

"divination through dreams," 1650s; see oneiro- "dream" + -mancy "divination by means of." Greek had oneiromantis "an interpreter of dreams." Related: oneiromantic.

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exegete (n.)
"one who expounds or interprets a literary production," 1730s, from Greek exegetes "an expounder, interpreter" (especially of the Bible), from exegeisthai (see exegesis).
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gazetteer (n.)
1610s, "journalist," from gazette (n.) + -eer. Meaning "geographical dictionary" is from 1704, from Laurence Eachard's 1693 geographical handbook for journalists, "The Gazetteer's, or Newsman's, Interpreter," second edition simply titled "The Gazetteer."
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hermeneutic (adj.)
"interpretive," 1670s, from Latinized form of Greek hermeneutikos "of or for interpreting," from hermeneutes "interpreter," from hermeneuein "to interpret (foreign languages); interpret into words, give utterance to," a word of unknown origin (formerly considered ultimately a derivative of Hermes, as the tutelary divinity of speech, writing, and eloquence).
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spokesman (n.)
1510s, "an interpreter," 1530s in the sense of "person who speaks for another or others." Irregular formation from spoke, past tense of speak (actually a back-formation from spoken) + man (n.). Perhaps on analogy of craftsman. Spokeswoman is from 1650s; spokesperson is from 1972; spokesmodel is attested from 1990.
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auspex (n.)

"one who observes flights of birds for the purpose of taking omens," 1590s, from Latin auspex "interpreter of omens given by birds," from PIE *awi-spek- "observer of birds," from root *awi- "bird" + root *spek- "to observe." Compare Greek oionos "bird of prey," also "bird of omen, omen," and ornis "bird," which also could mean "omen."

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