Etymology
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interposition (n.)
late 14c., from Old French interposicion "interpolation, intercalation; suspension, break" (12c.), from Latin interpositionem (nominative interpositio) "an insertion," noun of action from past participle stem of interponere "to put between, place among; put forward," from inter "between" (see inter-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)).
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entrepot (n.)
"warehouse," 1758, from French entrepôt (16c.), from Latin interpositum "that which is placed between," neuter past participle of interponere "to place between" (see interposition).
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tmesis (n.)
1580s, from Greek tmesis "a cutting," related to temnein "to cut," tome "a cutting" (from PIE root *tem- "to cut"). The separation of the elements of a compound word by the interposition of another word or words (such as a whole nother).
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providential (adj.)

1610s, "pertaining to foresight" (implied in providentially); 1640s as "pertaining to divine providence," from Latin providentia "foresight, precaution, foreknowledge" (see providence) + -al (1). Meaning "by divine interposition, effected by the providence of God" is recorded from 1719. Related: Providentially.

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insulation (n.)
noun of action from insulate (v.) in its various senses. From 1767 as "a blocking from electricity or heat" (by interposition of a non-conductor). Sense of "state or action of being detached from others" is from 1798. Literal meaning "act of making (land) into an island" is from 1784; that of "state of being an island" is from 1799. The concrete sense of "insulating material" is recorded by 1870.
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recusal (n.)

"an objection to a judge as prejudiced" (usually reflective), 1911; from recuse + -al (2). Earlier were recusancy "obstinate refusal or opposition" (1560s), recusance (1590s); recusation (c. 1400), as a legal term for an interposition of an objection or challenge for cause to a judge, arbitration, etc.

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insulate (v.)
1530s, "make into an island," from Late Latin insulatus "made like an island," from insula "island" (see isle). Sense of "place in an isolated situation, cause (someone or something) to be detached from surroundings" is from 1785. Electrical/chemical sense of "block from electricity or heat" (by interposition of a non-conductor) is from 1742. Related: Insulated; insulating.
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