Etymology
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interesting (adj.)
1711, "that concerns, important" (archaic), present-participle adjective from interest (v.). Meaning "engaging the attention, so as to excite interest" is from 1751. Related: Interestingly. Euphemistic phrase interesting condition, etc., "pregnant" is from 1748.
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uninteresting (adj.)
"not capable of exciting interest," 1769, from un- (1) "not" + interesting.
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colorful (adj.)

1872, "full of color," from color (n.) + -ful. From 1876 in the figurative sense of "interesting." Related: Colorfully; colorfulness.

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engaging (adj.)
"interesting, winning, attractive," 1670s, present-participle adjective from engage. Related: Engagingly.
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readability (n.)

1829, "readableness," especially "quality that makes something pleasurable or interesting to read;" from readable + -ity.

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conversationalist (n.)

"a talker," especially an agreeable or interesting one, 1836; see conversational + -ist. Conversationist was used from 1806 in the sense "a talker, one addicted to talking."

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unreadable (adj.)

1787, of written material, "dull, distasteful," from un- (1) "not" + readable (adj.). Meaning "illegible" is from 1830, but is better left to illegible.

The illegible is not plain enough to be deciphered; the unreadable is not interesting enough to be perused. [Fowler]
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cocaine (n.)

alkaloid obtained from the leaves of the coca plant, 1874, from Modern Latin cocaine (1856), coined by Albert Niemann of Gottingen University from coca (from Quechua cuca) + chemical suffix -ine (2). A medical coinage, the drug was used 1870s as a local anaesthetic for eye surgery, etc. "It is interesting to note that although cocaine is pronounced as a disyllabic word it is trisyllabic in its formation" [Flood]. Cocainism "addiction to cocaine" is recorded by 1885.

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amusing (adj.)
1590s, "cheating;" present-participle adjective from amuse (v.). Sense of "interesting" is from 1712; that of "pleasantly entertaining, tickling to the fancy" is by 1826. Noted late 1920s as a vogue word. Amusive has been tried in all senses since 18c. and might be useful, but it never caught on. Related: Amusingly; amusingness.
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abstracted (adj.)

"absent in mind, distracted from present reality by intellectual activity," 1640s, past-participle adjective from abstract (v.). Related: Abstractedly.

An absent man is one whose mind wanders unconsciously from his immediate surroundings, or from the topic which demands his attention; he may be thinking of little or nothing. An abstracted man is kept from what is present by thoughts and feelings so weighty or interesting that they engross his attention. [Century Dictionary]
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