Etymology
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interchange (n.)
early 15c., "an exchange, act of exchanging reciprocally," from Old French entrechange, from entrechangier (see interchange (v.)). Meaning "alternate succession" is from 1550s. In reference to a type of road junction, 1944.
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interchange (v.)
late 14c., enterchaungen, "to give and receive reciprocally; to alternate, put each in place of the other" (trans.), also "change reciprocally" (intrans.), from Old French entrechangier "interchange, exchange," from entre- "between" (see inter-) + changier "to change" (see change (v.)). Related: Interchanged; interchanging.
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mutuality (n.)

"reciprocity, interchange," 1580s, from mutual + -ity.

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gif (n.)
1987, acronym from Graphics Interchange Format.
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ASCII 
1963, initialism (acronym) from "American Standard Code for Information Interchange."
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clover-leaf (n.)

also cloverleaf, "the leaf of a clover plant," 1787, from clover + leaf (n.). Highway interchange sense attested by 1933, so called for the shape.

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vice- 

word-forming element meaning "deputy, assistant, substitute," also "instead of, in place of," 15c., from Latin vice "in place of," ablative of vicis "a change, a turn, interchange alternation" (from PIE root *weik- (2) "to bend, to wind"). In Middle English sometimes borrowed in Old French form vis-, vi-.

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vicissitude (n.)

"a passing from one state to another," whether regular or not, 1560s, from French vicissitude (14c.), from Latin vicissitudinem (nominative vicissitudo) "change, interchange, alternation," from vicissim (adv.) "changeably, on the other hand, by turns, in turn," from vicis "a turn, change" (from PIE root *weik- (2) "to bend, to wind"). Related: Vicissitudes.

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vicarious (adj.)

1630s, "taking the place of another," from Latin vicarius "that supplies a place; substituted, delegated," from vicis "a change, exchange, interchange; succession, alternation, substitution," from PIE root *weik- (2) "to bend, to wind."

From 1690s as "done or experienced in place of another" (usually in reference to punishment, often of Christ); from 1929 as "experienced imaginatively through another." Related: Vicariously.

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debate (n.)

early 14c., "a quarrel, dispute, disagreement" (now archaic), from Old French debat, from debatre(see debate (v.)). Sense of "contention by argument" is from late 14c., that of "a formal dispute, a debating contest, interchange of arguments in a somewhat formal manner" is perhaps from early 15c.

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