Etymology
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intercede (v.)
1570s, "to come between in space or time" (obsolete); c. 1600, "to interpose on behalf of another," a back-formation from intercession, or else from Latin intercedere "intervene, come between, be between" (in Medieval Latin "to interpose on someone's behalf"), from inter "between" (see inter-) + cedere "to go" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Related: Interceded; interceding.
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intercessor (n.)
"one who pleads or intervenes on behalf of another," late 15c., from a specific Christian use of Latin intercessor "one who intervenes, a mediator," agent noun from intercedere (see intercede). Related: Intercessory.
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intercession (n.)
early 15c., "act of interceding;" c. 1500, "intercessory prayer, a pleading on behalf of oneself or another," from Latin intercessionem (nominative intercessio) "a going between, coming between, mediation," noun of action from past participle stem of intercedere "intervene, come between, be between" (in Medieval Latin "to interpose on someone's behalf;" see intercede). The sense "pleading on behalf of another" developed in Christianity.
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*ked- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to go, yield."

It forms all or part of: abscess; accede; access; ancestor; antecede; antecedent; cease; cede; cession; concede; decease; exceed; excess; incessant; intercede; necessary; precede; predecessor; proceed; recede; recess; recession; secede; secession; succeed; success.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sedhati "to drive, chase away;" Avestan apa-had- "turn aside, step aside;" Latin cedere "to yield, give place; to give up some right or property," originally "to go from, proceed, leave;" Old Church Slavonic chodu "a walking, going," choditi "to go."
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