Etymology
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intention (n.)
late 14c., entencioun, "purpose, design, aim or object; will, wish, desire, that which is intended," from Old French entencion "intent, purpose, aspiration; will; thought" (12c.), from Latin intentionem (nominative intentio) "a stretching out, straining, exertion, effort; attention," noun of action from intendere "to turn one's attention," literally "to stretch out" (see intend). Also in Middle English "emotion, feelings; heart, mind, mental faculties, understanding."
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intentions (n.)
"one's purposes with regard to courtship and marriage," by 1796; see intention.
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intentioned (adj.)
"having intentions" (of a specified kind), 16c., from intention + -ed.
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intentional (adj.)

"done with intention, design, or purpose; intended," 1520s, from intention + -al (1) or else from Medieval Latin intentionalis. Intentional fallacy recorded from 1946. Related: Intentionality.

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intension (n.)
c. 1600, "action of stretching; increase of degree or force," from Latin intensionem/intentionem (nominative intensio/intentio) "a stretching, straining," figuratively "exertion, effort," noun of action from past participle stem of intendere in its literal sense of "stretch out, strain" (see intend, and compare intention, which has the figurative sense). Related: Intensional.
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meaningly (adv.)

"in a meaning manner, significantly, with intention," mid-15c., from meaning + -ly (2).

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disinformation (n.)

"The dissemination of deliberately false information, esp. when supplied by a government or its agent to a foreign power or to the media, with the intention of influencing the policies or opinions of those who receive it" [OED], 1955, from Russian dezinformatsiya (1949), which is said to be from French désinformation, but the French word is not as old as the Russian one; see dis- + information.

Simply put, disinformation is a falsehood created with the intention to cause harm. Misinformation is also false, but created or shared without the intention to deceive others. [New York Times, Oct. 26, 2020]
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attent (adj.)
late 15c., "attentive," from Latin attentus, past participle of attendere "give heed to" (see attend). As a noun, "intention, aim" (early 13c.), from Old French atente "act of attending," from fem. of Latin attentus.
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scrap (n.2)

"a fight, struggle, tussle," 1846, possibly a dialectal variant of scrape (n.1) on the notion of "an abrasive encounter" [Century Dictionary]. Weekley and OED suggest obsolete colloquial scrap "scheme, villainy, vile intention" (1670s).

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domicile (n.)

mid-15c., "place of residence of a person or family," from Old French domicile (14c.) and directly from Latin domicilium, perhaps from domus "house" (from PIE root *dem- "house, household") + colere "to dwell" (see colony). In law, specifically, "that residence from which there is no intention to remove, or a general intention to return" (mid-18c.).

As a verb, "to establish in a fixed residence," it is attested by 1762 (implied in domiciled). Related: Domiciliary.

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