Etymology
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intense (adj.)
early 15c., of situations or qualities, "great, extreme," from Old French intense (13c.), from Latin intensus "stretched, strained, high-strung, tight," originally past participle of intendere in its literal sense of "stretch out, strain" (see intend). From 1630s of persons, "high-strung." Related: Intensely; intenseness.
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intensity (n.)
1660s, from intense + -ity. Earlier was intenseness (1610s). A scientific term originally; sense of "extreme depth of feeling" attested by 1830.
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intensify (v.)

1817 (transitive), from intense + -ify, first attested in Coleridge, in place of intend, which he said no longer was felt as connected with intense. Intransitive sense is from 1845. Middle English used intensen (v.) "to increase (something), strengthen, intensify," early 15c. Related: Intensified; intensifying.

I am aware that this word [intensifying] occurs neither in Johnson's Dictionary nor in any classical writer. But the word, "to intend," which Newton and others before him employ in this sense, is now so completely appropriated to another meaning, that I could not use it without ambiguity: while to paraphrase the sense, as by render intense, would often break up the sentence and destroy that harmony of the position of the words with the logical position of the thoughts, which is a beauty in all composition, and more especially desirable in a close philosophical investigation. I have therefore hazarded the word, intensify; though, I confess, it sounds uncouth to my own ear. [Coleridge, footnote in "Biographia Literaria," 1817]
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luster (n.2)
"one who feels intense longing desire," 1590s, agent noun from lust (v.).
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saeva indignatio 

Latin phrase from Swift's epitaph; "savage indignation;" an intense feeling of contemptuous anger at human folly.

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concentrate (n.)
Origin and meaning of concentrate

"that which has been reduced to a state of purity," 1883, from concentrate(adj.) "reduced to a pure or intense state" (1640s), from concentrate (v.).

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gelid (adj.)

"very cold," c. 1600, from Latin gelidus "icy, cold, frosty," from gelum "frost, ice, intense cold" (from PIE root *gel- "cold; to freeze"). Related: Gelidity.

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carpet-bombing (n.)
"the dropping of a large number of bombs on an entire area to inflict intense damage," 1945, from carpet (v.) + bomb (v.). Related: Carpet-bomb; carpet-bombed.
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grill (v.)
"to broil on a grill," 1660s, from grill (n.); figurative sense from 1842, and the specific (transitive) sense of "to subject to intense questioning" is first attested 1894. Related: Grilled; grilling.
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hippomania (n.)
"excessive fondness for horses" (especially in reference to the intense and passionate interest in horses developed in some girls between ages 10 and 14), 1956, from hippo- "horse" + mania.
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