Etymology
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intelligible (adj.)
late 14c., "able to understand, intelligent," from Latin intelligibilis, intellegibilis "that can understand; that can be understood," from intellegere "to understand, come to know" (see intelligence). In Middle English also "to be grasped by the intellect" (rather than the senses). In English, sense of "capable of being understood, that can be understood" first recorded c. 1600. Related: Intelligibly.
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unintelligible (adj.)
1610s, "incapable of being understood," from un- (1) "not" + intelligible. Related: Unintelligibly.
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elucidation (n.)
1560s, "act of making intelligible," noun of action from elucidate. As "an explanation" from 1660s.
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inapprehensible (adj.)

"not intelligible," 1640s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + apprehensible.

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popularize (v.)

"to make a complex topic intelligible to the common people," 1833; see popular + -ize. Earlier "to cater to popular taste" (1590s); "to make popular" (1797). Related: Popularized; popularizer; popularizing.

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inarticulate (adj.)
c. 1600, "not clear or intelligible" (of speech); "not jointed or hinged, not composed of segments connected by joints" (in biology), from Late Latin inarticulatus "not articulate, not distinct," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + articulatus, past participle of articulare "to separate into joints; to utter distinctly" (see articulation). Of persons, "not able to speak clearly," 1754. Related: Inarticulately; inarticulateness; inarticulable.
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distinct (adj.)

late 14c., "not identical, not the same," also "clearly perceptible by sense," past-participle adjective from obsolete distincten (c. 1300) "to distinguish one thing from another; make distinct," from Old French distincter, from Latin distinctus, past participle of distinguere "to separate between, keep separate, mark off" (see distinguish). Meaning "plain and intelligible to the mind" is from c. 1600. Related: Distinctness.

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elucidate (v.)

"make clear or manifest, throw light upon, explain, render intelligible," 1560s, perhaps via French élucider (15c.) or directly from Late Latin elucidatus, past participle of elucidare "make light or clear," from assimilated form of ex "out, away" (see ex-) + lucidus "light, bright, clear," figuratively "perspicuous, lucid, clear," from lucere "to shine" (from PIE root *leuk- "to shine, be bright"). Related: Elucidated; elucidates; elucidating.

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macaronic (adj.)

1610s, in literature, in reference to a form of verse consisting of vernacular words in a Latin context with Latin endings; applied loosely to verse in which two or more languages are jumbled together with little regard to syntax but so constructed as to be intelligible; from Modern Latin macaronicus (coined 1517 by Teofilo Folengo, who popularized the style in Italy), from dialectal Italian maccarone (see macaroni), in reference to the mixture of words in the verse: "quoddam pulmentum farina, caseo, botiro compaginatum, grossum, rude, et rusticanum" [Folengo].

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