Etymology
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insurrection (n.)
"an uprising against civil authority," early 15c., insurreccion, from Old French insurreccion or directly from Late Latin insurrectionem (nominative insurrectio) "a rising up," noun of action from past participle stem of insurgere "to rise up" (see insurgent).
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insurrectionary (adj.)
1796, from insurrection + -ary. As a noun from 1893. Earlier adjectives were insurrectional (1794), insurrective (1590s), insurrectious (1630s). Insurrectionist (n.) is from 1811.
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upset (n.)
early 15c., "insurrection," from upset (v.). Meaning "overturning of a vehicle or boat" is recorded from 1804.
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ruction (n.)

"disturbance, disorderly dispute," 1825, a dialectal or colloquial word of unknown origin. Perhaps from eruption or an altered shortening of insurrection.

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uprising (n.)
mid-13c., "action of rising from death or the grave, resurrection," from up (adv.) + rising (n.). Meaning "action of rising from bed" is recorded from c. 1300; sense of "insurrection, popular revolt" first attested 1580s.
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Vendee 
department of western France, French Vendée, named for the river through it, which is perhaps from Gaulish vindos "white." Especially in reference to the insurrection there against the Republic in 1793. Related: Vendean.
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revolt (n.)

"insurrection, rebellion, uprising against government or authority," 1550s, from French révolte (c. 1500), which is a back-formation from revolter (see revolt (v.)) or else from cognate Italian rivolta.

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rising (n.)

c. 1200, "resurrection, act or fact of rising from the dead," especially of the Resurrection of Christ; c. 1300, "action of rising from sleep, getting out of med," verbal noun from rise (v.). Of heavenly bodies, "appearance above the horizon," from mid-14c. Of tides, rivers, etc., late 14c. Also from mid-14c. as "act of standing up." The sense of "insurrection, hostile demonstration of people opposed to the government" is from late 14c.

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secession (n.)
Origin and meaning of secession
1530s, from Latin secessionem (nominative secessio) "a withdrawal, separation; political withdrawal, insurrection, schism," noun of action from past participle stem of secedere "go away, withdraw, separate; rebel, revolt," from se- "apart" (see secret (n.)) + cedere "to go" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Originally in a Roman historical context, "temporary migration of plebeians from the city to compel patricians to address their grievances;" modern use in reference to religious or political unions dates from 1650s.
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insurgent (n.)
"one who rises in revolt" against a government or its laws, 1745, from Latin insurgentem (nominative insurgens), present participle of insurgere "rise up, lift oneself; rise against; stand high, gather force," from in- "against," or here perhaps merely intensive, + surgere "to rise" (see surge (n.)).

An obsolete verb insurge (from French insurger) "to rise in opposition or insurrection" was common 16c. For verb forms 19c. writers sometimes turned to insurrectionize or insurrect.
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