Etymology
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insurgent (n.)
"one who rises in revolt" against a government or its laws, 1745, from Latin insurgentem (nominative insurgens), present participle of insurgere "rise up, lift oneself; rise against; stand high, gather force," from in- "against," or here perhaps merely intensive, + surgere "to rise" (see surge (n.)).

An obsolete verb insurge (from French insurger) "to rise in opposition or insurrection" was common 16c. For verb forms 19c. writers sometimes turned to insurrectionize or insurrect.
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insurgency (n.)
1798, from insurgent + abstract noun suffix -cy.
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insurgence (n.)
1776; see insurgent + -ence. Perhaps from French insurgence (by 1740s).
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insurrection (n.)
"an uprising against civil authority," early 15c., insurreccion, from Old French insurreccion or directly from Late Latin insurrectionem (nominative insurrectio) "a rising up," noun of action from past participle stem of insurgere "to rise up" (see insurgent).
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Ustashi 
Croatian separatise movement, 1932, from Croatian Ustaše, plural of Ustaša "insurgent, rebel."
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riser (n.)

late 14c., risere, "rebel, insurgent, one who rises in revolt," agent noun from rise (v.). Meaning "one who rises" (from bed, in a certain manner) is from mid-15c. Meaning "upright face of a stair-step" is by 1738.

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mujahidin (n.)

also mujahideen, "Muslim fundamentalist guerrilla," 1958, in a Pakistani context, from Persian and Arabic, plural of mujahid "one who fights in a jihad" (q.v.); in modern use, "Muslim guerrilla insurgent."

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rebellion (n.)

"war waged against a government by some portion of its subjects" (originally especially against God or Church authority), mid-14c., rebellioun, from Old French rebellion (14c.) and directly from Latin rebellionem (nominative rebellio) "rebellion, revolt; renewal of war," from rebellis "insurgent, rebellious" (see rebel (adj.)).

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rebel (adj.)

c. 1300, "resisting an established or rightful government or law, insurrectionist; lawless," from Old French rebelle "stubborn, obstinate, rebellious" (12c.) and directly from Latin rebellis "insurgent, rebellious," from rebellare "to rebel, revolt," from re- "opposite, against," or perhaps "again" (see re-) + bellare "wage war," from bellum "war" (see bellicose). By 1680s as "belonging to or controlled by rebels."

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