Etymology
Advertisement
insurance (n.)

1550s, "engagement to marry," a variant of ensurance "an assurance, pledge, guarantee," from Old French enseurance "assurance," from ensurer, from en- "make" (see en- (1)) + sur "safe, secure, undoubted" (see sure (adj.)).

Commercial sense of "security against loss or death in exchange for payment" is from 1650s. Assurance was the older word for this specific sense (late 16c.). Compare insure.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cif 

also c.i.f., abbreviation of cost, insurance, freight, a trade term.

Related entries & more 
underwriter (n.)

1610s, "subscriber," agent noun from underwrite (v.). Insurance sense is from 1620s.

Related entries & more 
no-fault (adj.)

as a type of U.S. motor vehicle insurance, 1967, from no + fault (n.).

Related entries & more 
long-term (adj.)

also longterm, 1876, originally in insurance underwriting, from long (adj.) + term (n.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
underwrite (v.)

Old English underwritan "write at the foot of; subscribe;" see under + write (v.). A loan-translation of Latin subscribere (see subscribe). Used literally at first; modern sense of "to accept the risk of insurance" (1620s) is from notion of signing a marine insurance policy. Meaning "to support by a guarantee of money" is recorded from 1890.

Related entries & more 
pre-existing (adj.)

also preexisting, 1590s, present-participle adjective from pre-exist. The medical insurance pre-existing condition is attested from 1942.

Related entries & more 
non-returnable (adj.)

also nonreturnable, 1896, originally in insurance, "that may not be returned," from non- + returnable. In reference to packaging, by 1926.

Related entries & more 
adjuster (n.)

1670s, agent noun in English form from adjust. The insurance sense of "one who settles the amount to be paid for a claim under a policy, after making proper allowances and deductions," is from 1830.

Related entries & more 
Medicare (n.)

name for a state-run health insurance system for the elderly, 1962, originally in a Canadian context, from medical (adj.) + care (n.). U.S. use is from 1965; the U.S. program was set up by Title XVIII of the Social Security Act of 1965.

Related entries & more