Etymology
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insufficient (adj.)
late 14c., from Old French insufficient (14c.) or directly from Late Latin insufficientem (nominative insufficiens) "not sufficient," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + sufficientem (see sufficient). Originally of persons, "inadequate, unable;" of things, "lacking in what is necessary or required," from late 15c. Related: Insufficiently.
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insufficiency (n.)
1520s, from Old French insufficience and directly from Late Latin insufficientia "insufficience," abstract noun from insufficientem "insufficient" (see insufficient). Insufficience "deficiency" is from early 15c.
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incompetent (adj.)
1610s, "insufficient," from French incompétent, from Late Latin incompetentem (nominative incompetens) "insufficient," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Latin competentem (see competent). Sense of "lacking qualification or ability" first recorded 1630s. The noun meaning "incompetent person" is from 1866. Related: Incompetently.
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malnourished (adj.)

"suffering from insufficient nutrition," 1906, from mal- "bad, badly" + nourished (see nourish).

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inadequacy (n.)

"incompleteness, ineffectiveness, state or quality of being insufficient," 1764, from inadequate + abstract noun suffix -cy. Related: Inadequacies.

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inadequate (adj.)

"not equal to what is required, insufficient to effect the end desired," 1670s; see in- (1) "not, opposite of" + adequate. Related: Inadequately.

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firetrap (n.)
also fire-trap, "place at great risk of destruction by fire and with insufficient means of escape," 1882, from fire (n.) + trap (n.).
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unequal (adj.)
1530s, "unjust, unfair," from un- (1) "not" + equal (adj.). Meaning "not the same in amount, size, quality, etc." is recorded from 1560s (inequal in this sense is from late 14c.). Sense of "inadequate, insufficient" (to some task) is attested from 1690s. Related: Unequally.
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frivolous (adj.)
mid-15c., from Latin frivolus "silly, empty, trifling, worthless," diminutive of *frivos "broken, crumbled," from friare "break, rub away, crumble" (see friable). In law (by 1736), "so clearly insufficient as to need no argument to show its weakness." Related: Frivolously; frivolousness.
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con (adj.)

"swindling," 1889 (in con man), American English, from confidence man (1849), from the many scams in which the victim is induced to hand over money as a token of confidence. Confidence with a sense of "assurance based on insufficient grounds" dates from 1590s. Con artist is attested by 1910.

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