Etymology
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instruct (v.)

early 15c., "to tell, inform, impart knowledge or information," also "furnish with authoritative directions," from Latin instructus, past participle of instruere "arrange, prepare, set in order; inform, teach," literally "to build, erect," from in- "on" (from PIE root *en "in") + struere "to pile, build" (from PIE *streu-, extended form of root *stere- "to spread"). Related: Instructed; instructing.

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instructive (adj.)

"serving to instruct or inform," 1610s, from instruct (v.) + -ive. An earlier adjective was instructing (1580s). Related: Instructively; instructiveness.

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instructor (n.)

mid-15c., from Old French instructeur (14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin instructor "teacher" (in classical Latin, "preparer"), agent noun from instruere "arrange; inform, teach" (see instruct).

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*stere- 

*sterə-, also *ster-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to spread."

It forms all or part of: consternate; consternation; construct; construction; destroy; destruction; industry; instruct; instruction; instrument; obstruct; obstruction; perestroika; prostrate; sternum; sternocleidomastoid; strain (n.2) "race, stock, line;" stratagem; strategy; strath; strato-; stratocracy; stratography; stratosphere; stratum; stratus; straw; stray; street; strew; stroma; structure; substrate; substratum; substructure.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit strnoti "strews, throws down;" Avestan star- "to spread out, stretch out;" Greek stronymi "strew," stroma "bedding, mattress," sternon "breast, breastbone;" Latin sternere "to stretch, extend;" Old Church Slavonic stira, streti "spread," strana "area, region, country;" Russian stroji "order;" Gothic straujan, Old High German strouwen, Old English streowian "to sprinkle, strew;" Old English streon "strain," streaw "straw, that which is scattered;" Old High German stirna "forehead," strala "arrow, lightning bolt;" Old Irish fo-sernaim "spread out," srath "a wide river valley;" Welsh srat "plain."

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catechize (v.)

"instruct orally by asking questions and receiving answers" (and offering explanations and corrections), especially "to instruct on Christian doctrine," early 15c., from Church Latin catechizare "to teach by word of mouth" (also source of French catéchiser, Spanish catequizar, Italian catechizzare), from Greek katēkhizein "teach orally, instruct by word of mouth," from katēkhein "to resound" (see catechesis). Related: Catechized; catechizing.

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trainee (n.)

1841, from train (v.) in the "instruct" sense + -ee.

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inform (v.)

early 14c., "to train or instruct in some specific subject," from Old French informer, enformer "instruct, teach" (13c.) and directly from Latin informare "to shape, give form to, delineate," figuratively "train, instruct, educate," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + formare "to form, shape," from forma "form" (see form (n.)). In early use also enform until c. 1600. Sense of "report facts or news, communicate information to" first recorded late 14c. Related: Informed; informing.

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catechist (n.)

"one who instructs orally;" especially "one appointed to instruct catechumens in the principles of religion as a preparation for baptism," 1560s, from Church Latin catechista, from Greek katēkhistēs "one who catechizes," from katēkhizein "teach orally, instruct by word of mouth," from katēkhein "to resound" (see catechesis). Related: Catechistic; catechistical.

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edify (v.)
Origin and meaning of edify

mid-14c., "to build, construct," also, in figurative use, "to build up morally or in faith," from Old French edefiier (12c., Modern French édifier) "build; install; teach, instruct (morally)," from Latin aedificare "to build, construct," in Late Latin "improve spiritually, instruct" (see edifice). Related: Edified; edifying.

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