Etymology
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instigation (n.)

early 15c., instigaccioun, "urging, incitement; impelling force," from Old French instigacion "instigation," and directly from Latin instigationem (nominative instigatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of instigare "urge on, incite," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + *stigare, a root meaning "to prick," from PIE root *steig- "to prick, stick, pierce" (see stick (v.)).

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instigate (v.)
1540s, back-formation from instigation or else from Latin instigatus, past participle of instigare "to urge on, incite" (source also of French instiguer). Related: Instigated; instigates; instigating.
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instigator (n.)
1590s, from Latin instigator "a stimulator," agent noun from instigare "urge on, incite" (see instigation). The classical Latin fem. form instigatrix is recorded in English from 1610s.
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enticement (n.)
c. 1300, "thing which entices," from Old French enticement "incitement, instigation, suggestion," from enticier (see entice). From 1540s as "action of enticing."
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excitation (n.)

late 14c., excitacioun, "act of rousing to action; instigation, incitement; state of being excited," from Old French excitation, from Late Latin excitationem (nominative excitatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of excitare "to call out, wake, rouse, stir up" (see excite).

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impulsion (n.)
early 15c., "a driving, pushing, thrusting," from Old French impulsion (14c.), from Latin impulsionem (nominative impulsio) "external pressure," figuratively "incitement, instigation," noun of action from past participle stem of impellere (see impel).
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solicitation (n.)

late 15c., "management," from French solicitation and directly from Latin solicitationem (nominative solicitatio) "vexation, disturbance, instigation," noun of action from past-participle stem of solicitare "to disturb, rouse, stimulate, provoke"

(see solicit). Meaning "action of soliciting" is from 1520s. Specific sexual sense is from c. 1600.

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prod (v.)

1530s, "to poke with a stick," of uncertain origin; possibly [Barnhart, Century Dictionary] a variant of brod, from Middle English brodden "to goad," from Old Norse broddr "shaft, spike" (see brad), or perhaps imitative [OED]. Compare dialectal prog "pointed instrument for poking" (1610s), also as a verb, "to poke about." 

Figurative sense of "mental incitement or instigation" is by 1871. Related: Prodded; prodding.

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movement (n.)

late 14c., mevement, "change of position; passage from place to place," from Old French movement "movement, exercise; start, instigation" (Modern French mouvement), from Medieval Latin movimentum, from Latin movere "to move, set in motion" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away"). In the musical sense of "major division of a piece" it is attested from 1776; in the political/artistic/social sense of "course of acts and endeavors by a body of persons toward some specific end" is from 1828. Related: Movements.

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impulse (n.)
early 15c., "an act of impelling, a thrust, push," from Latin impulsus "a push against, pressure, shock," figuratively "incitement, instigation," past participle of impellere "to strike against, push against," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + pellere "to push, drive" (from PIE root *pel- (5) "to thrust, strike, drive"). Meaning "a stimulus in the mind to action, arising from some state or feeling" is first recorded 1640s. As an adjective, in reference to purchases made on impulse, 1955 (in impulse buyer).
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