Etymology
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instep (n.)

"arch of the foot," mid-15c., apparently from in + step, "though this hardly makes sense" [Weekley]. An Old English word for "instep" was fotwelm. Middle English had also a verb instep "to track, trace" (c. 1400). Old English instæpe (n.) meant "an entrance."

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gaiter (n.)
"leather cover for the ankle," 1775, from French guêtre "belonging to peasant attire," of uncertain origin; probably ultimately from Frankish *wrist "instep," or a similar Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *wirstiz (source also of German Rist "instep," English wrist), from *wreik- "to turn," from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend." Related: Gaiters; gaitered (1760).
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tarsal (adj.)
"of or pertaining to the ankle or instep," 1817, from tarsus (n.) + -al (1), or from medical Latin tarsalis.
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wrist (n.)

Old English wrist, from Proto-Germanic *wristiz (source also of Old Norse rist "instep," Old Frisian wrist, Middle Dutch wrist, German Rist "back of the hand, instep"), from *wreik- "to turn," from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend." The notion is "the turning joint." Wrist-watch is from 1889. Wrist-band is from 1570s as a part of a sleeve, 1969 as a perspiration absorber.

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bluchers (n.)
type of old-style boots, by 1837, from Field Marshal Gebhard Leberecht Blücher (1742-1819), in the later campaigns against Napoleon commander of the Prussian army, who is said to have taken an interest in the footwear of his soldiery. Prince Blucher demi boots were described in 1815 as "military (or half-boots), of royal purple, or dark blue morocco or kid leather, also of purple satin; a small scarlet star, embroidered on the instep, and scarlet bound; red leather buttons (covered red); thin narrow soles, made right and left; broad duck-web toes." Compare Wellington.
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Oxford 

university town in England, Middle English Oxforde, from Old English Oxnaforda (10c.) literally "where the oxen ford" (see ox + ford (n.)). In reference to a type of shoe laced over the instep, it is attested from 1721 (Oxford-cut shoes). In reference to an accent supposedly characteristic of members of the university, by 1855. Related: Oxfordian; Oxfordish; Oxfordist; Oxfordy.

Oxford comma for "serial comma" (the second in A, B, and C) is attested by 1990s, from its being used by Oxford University Press or its recommendation by Henry W. Fowler, long associated with Oxford University, in his influential and authoritative book on English usage (1926) in which he writes "there is no agreement at present on the punctuation," but adds that the omission of the serial comma "often leaves readers helpless against ambiguity."

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