Etymology
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instead (adv.)
1590s, contraction of Middle English prepositional phrase ine stede (early 13c.; see stead), itself a loan-translation of Latin in loco (French en lieu de). Typically written as two words until mid-17c.
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step-ladder (n.)
also stepladder, one with flat steps instead of rungs, 1728, from step (n.) + ladder.
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antonomasia (n.)

rhetorical substitution of an epithet for a proper name (or vice versa; as in His Holiness for the name of a pope), 1580s, from Latin, from Greek antonomasia, from antonomazein "to name instead, call by a new name," from anti "instead" (see anti-) + onomazein "to name," from onoma "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name"). Related: Antonomastic.

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approval (n.)
"commendation, sanction," 1680s, from approve + -al (2). According to OED, "Rare bef. 1800; now generally used instead of" approvance (1590s, from French aprovance).
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Aquarian (adj.)
"pertaining to the zodiacal sign of Aquarius," 1940 in reference to the astrological Age of Aquarius (see Aquarius + -ian). Earlier, "one who uses water instead of wine at the Eucharist" (1580s).
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clock-radio (n.)

"combined bedside radio and alarm clock which can be set to turn on the radio instead of sounding the alarm," 1946, from clock (n.1) + radio (n.).

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aquatint (n.)
also aqua-tint, 1782, "engraving made with aqua fortis," from Italian acquatinta, from Latin aqua tincta "dyed water;" see aqua- + tinct. The spaces are bitten, instead of the lines as in etching.
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policlinic (n.)

1827, originally, "clinic held in a private house" (instead of a hospital), from German Poliklinik, from Greek polis "city" (see polis) + Klinik, from French clinique (see clinic). Later "a clinic in a city not attached to a hospital."

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roller-skate (n.)

also rollerskate, "a skate mounted on small wheels instead of iron or steel runners," 1861, American English, from roller + skate (n.2). The verb is from 1885. Related: Roller-skated; roller-skater; roller-skating.

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suckle (v.)
c. 1400, perhaps a causative or frequentative form of Middle English suken "to suck" (see suck), but OED suggests instead a back-formation from suckling (though this word is attested only from mid-15c.). Related: Suckled; suckling.
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