Etymology
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insipid (adj.)

1610s, "without taste or perceptible flavor," from French insipide "insipid" (16c.), from Late Latin inspidus "tasteless," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Latin sapidus "tasty," from sapere "have a taste" (also "be wise;" see sapient). Figurative meaning "uninteresting, dull" first recorded in English 1640s, probably from Medieval Latin or the Romance languages, where it was a secondary sense.

In ye coach ... went Mrs. Barlow, the King's mistress and mother to ye Duke of Monmouth, a browne, beautifull, bold, but insipid creature. [John Evelyn, diary, Aug. 18, 1649]

Related: Insipidly.

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sapid (adj.)

1630s, "having the power of affecting the organs of taste," from Latin sapidus "savory, having a taste," from sapere (see sapient). Also figurative, "gratifying to the mind or its tastes." Its opposite is insipid. Related: Sapidness; sapidity.

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fatuity (n.)

1640s, from French fatuité (14c.), from Latin fatuitatem (nominative fatuitas) "foolishness, folly," from fatuus "foolish, insipid" (see fatuous).

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vapid (adj.)
1650s, "flat, insipid" (of drinks), from Latin vapidus "flat, insipid," literally "that has exhaled its vapor," related to vappa "stale wine," and probably to vapor "vapor." Applied from 1758 to talk and writing deemed dull and lifeless. Related: Vapidly; vapidness.
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mawkish (adj.)

1660s, "sickly, nauseated" (a sense now obsolete), from Middle English mawke "maggot" (early 15c.; see maggot), but the literal sense of "maggoty" is not found. Figurative meaning "sickeningly sentimental, insipid" is recorded by 1702. Related: Mawkishly; mawkishness.

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unsavory (adj.)
also unsavoury, early 13c., "tasteless, insipid," from un- (1) "not" + savory (adj.). Meaning "unpleasant or disagreeable to the taste" is attested from late 14c.; of persons, from c. 1400. Related: Unsavoriness.
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tasteless (adj.)
1590s, "unable to taste;" c. 1600, "uninteresting, insipid" (figurative); 1610s, "having no taste;" 1670s, "tactless;" from taste (n.) + -less. Related: Tastelessly; tastelessness.
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pall (v.)

"become tiresome or insipid," 1700, a surviving transferred or figurative sense from the earlier meaning "become faint, fail in strength," from Middle English pallen (late 14c.), which is apparently [OED] a shortened form of appallen "to dismay, fill with horror or disgust" (see appall). Related: Palled; palling.

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bream (n.)
type of common European freshwater fish, late 14c., from Old French braisme "bream," from Frankish *brahsima, from West Germanic *brahsm- (compare Old High German brahsima), perhaps from Proto-Germanic base *brehwan "to shine, glitter, sparkle," from PIE *bherek- (see braid (v.)). Insipid and little esteemed as food. The name also was given to various similar fish in other places.
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