Etymology
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insert (n.)
"something inserted," 1893, especially a paper, etc., placed in among the pages of a newspaper, magazine, etc., from insert (v.).
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insert (v.)

"to set in, put or place in," 1520s, from Latin insertus, past participle of inserere "to graft, implant," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + serere "join together, arrange, put in a row," from PIE root *ser- (2) "to line up." Middle English had inseren "to set in place, to graft, to introduce (into the mind)" (late 14c.), directly from the Latin verb. Related: Inserted; inserting.

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insertion (n.)
1590s, "act of putting in," from French insertion (16c.) or directly from Late Latin insertionem (nominative insertio) "a putting in," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin inserere "to graft, implant" (see insert (v.)). Meaning "that which is inserted" attested from 1620s.
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*ser- (2)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to line up."

It forms all or part of: assert; assertion; assort; consort; desert (v.) "to leave one's duty;" desertion; dissertation; ensorcell; exert; exsert; insert; seriatim; seriation; series; sermon; serried; sorcerer; sorcery; sort.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sarat- "thread;" Greek eirein "to fasten together in rows;" Latin serere "to join, link, bind together," series "row, chain, series, sequence, succession;" Gothic sarwa (plural) "armor, arms;" Old Norse sörve "necklace of stringed pearls;" Old Irish sernaid "he joins together;" Welsh ystret "a row."

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parenthesize (v.)

"insert as a parenthesis, express or state in parentheses," 1825, from parenthesis + -ize. Related: Parenthesized; parenthesizing.

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sandwich (v.)

"insert between two other things," 1841, from sandwich (n.), on the image of meat pressed between identical pieces of bread. Related: Sandwiched; sandwiching.

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implantation (n.)
1570s, "manner of being implanted," from French implantation, noun of action from implanter "to insert, engraft" (see implant (v.)). From c. 1600 as "act of implanting;" in embryology from 1902.
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inlay (v.)
1590s, "insert in or into," from in (adv.) + lay (v.). As a noun, "that which is inlaid" (especially for ornamental effect), from 1650s. Related: Inlaid.
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graft (v.)
late 15c., "insert a shoot from one tree into another," from graft (n.1). Figurative use by 1530s. Surgical sense by 1868. Related: Grafted; grafting.
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inject (v.)
c. 1600, in medicine, from specialized sense of Latin iniectus "a casting on, a throwing over," past participle of inicere "to throw in or on; insert, bring into," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + -icere, combining form of iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Injectable; injected; injecting.
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