Etymology
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inscription (n.)

late 14c., from Latin inscriptionem (nominative inscriptio) "a writing upon, inscription," noun of action from past-participle stem of inscribere "inscribe, to write on or in (something)," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). Related: Inscriptional.

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*skribh- 
*skrībh-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to cut, separate, sift;" an extended form of root *sker- (1) "to cut."

It forms all or part of: ascribe; ascription; circumscribe; conscript; conscription; describe; description; festschrift; inscribe; inscription; manuscript; postscript; prescribe; prescription; proscribe; sans-serif; scribble; scribe; script; scriptorium; scripture; scrivener; serif; shrift; shrive; subscribe; superscribe; superscript; transcribe; scarification; scarify.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek skariphasthai "to scratch an outline, sketch;" Latin scribere "to write" (to carve marks in wood, stone, clay, etc.); Lettish skripat "scratch, write;" Old Norse hrifa "scratch."
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i.n.r.i. 
ecclesiastical inscription, it stands for Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum ("Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews," John xix.19).
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epigraph (n.)

1620s, "inscription on a building, statue, etc.," from Greek epigraphē "an inscription," from epigraphein "to mark the surface, just pierce; write on, inscribe; to register; inscribe one's name, endorse," from epi "on" (see epi-) + graphein "to write" (see -graphy). Sense of "motto; short, pithy sentence at the head of a book or chapter" first recorded in English 1844. Related: Epigraphic; epigraphical.

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medal (v.)

1857, "award (someone or something) a medal," from medal (n.); intransitive sense is by 1967. From 1845 as "stamp (an inscription, etc.) onto a medal." Related: Medaled; medalled; medaling; medalling.

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epigram (n.)

also epigramme, "short poem or verse which has only one subject and finishes by a witty or ingenious turn of thought," mid-15c., from Old French épigramme, from Latin epigramma "an inscription," from Greek epigramma "inscription (especially in verse) on a tomb, public monument, etc.; a written estimate," from epigraphein "to write on, inscribe" (see epigraph). "The term was afterward extended to any little piece of verse expressing with precision a delicate or ingenious thought" [Century Dictionary]. Related: Epigrammatist.

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stele (n.)

"upright slab," usually inscribed, 1820, from Greek stēlē "standing block, slab," especially one bearing an inscription, such as a gravestone, from PIE *stal-na-, suffixed form of root *stel- "to put, stand, put in order," with derivatives referring to a standing object or place. Related: Stelar.

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title (n.)

c. 1300, "inscription, heading," from Old French title "title or chapter of a book; position; legal permit" (12c., Modern French titre, by dissimilation), and in part from Old English titul, both from Latin titulus "inscription, label, ticket, placard, heading; honorable appellation, title of honor," of unknown origin. Meaning "name of a book, play, etc." first recorded mid-14c. The sense of "name showing a person's rank" in English is first attested 1580s. Sports championship sense attested from 1913 (originally in lawn tennis), hence titlist (1913). A title role in theater is one which gives its name to the play.

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memorize (v.)

1590s, "commit to writing, cause to be remembered by writing or inscription;" see memory + -ize. The meaning "commit to memory, learn by heart, keep in memory, have always in mind" is by 1838. Related: Memorized; memorist; memorizing.

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colophon (n.)

"publisher's inscription at the end of a book," 1774, from Late Latin colophon, from Greek kolophōn "summit, final touch" (from PIE root *kel- (2) "to be prominent; hill"). "In early times the colophon gave the information now given on the title page" [OED].

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