Etymology
Advertisement
innovate (v.)

1540s, "introduce as new" (transitive), from Latin innovatus, past participle of innovare "to renew, restore;" also "to change," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + novus "new" (see new). Intransitive meaning "bring in new things, alter established practices" is from 1590s. Related: Innovated; innovating.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
innovator (n.)
"an introducer of changes," 1590s, from Late Latin innovator, agent noun from innovare "to change" (see innovate).
Related entries & more 
innovative (adj.)

"tending to bring in something new; introducing or tending to introduce innovations; characterized by innovations," 1796 (with an isolated use from c. 1600); see innovate + -ive. Related: Innovatively; innovativeness.

Related entries & more