Etymology
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inland (adj.)
"of or pertaining to interior parts of a country," 1550s, from in + land (n.). The noun meaning "interior parts of a country (remote from the sea or borders)" is attested from 1570s. Meaning "confined to a country" (as opposed to foreign) is from 1540s. In Middle English and Old English the same compound meant "land immediately around the mansion of an estate, land in the lord's own occupation (as opposed to land occupied by tenants)." Related: Inlander.
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inlandish (adj.)
1650s, "produced at home, domestic, native," from inland in the "domestic, not foreign" sense + -ish. Also "characteristic of inland regions" (1849). Old English had inlendisc, inlende "native, indigenous."
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Seville 
inland port city in Spain, Spanish Sevilla, ultimately from Phoenician, from sefela "plain, valley."
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estuary (n.)
1530s, from Latin aestuarium "a tidal marsh, mudbeds covered by water at high tides; channel inland from the sea," from aestus "boiling (of the sea), tide, heat," from PIE *aidh- "to burn" (see edifice).
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midland (adj.)

early 15c., mydlonde, "in the interior of a country," frommid (adj.) + land (n.). As a noun from 1550s; especially of the inland central part of England. The earlier noun form was middel lond (c. 1300). Related: Midlands.

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Illyria 
ancient name of the country on the east shore of the Adriatic, at its greatest extending inland to the Danube, a name of obscure origin. Later a name of a division of Austria-Hungary including Carinthia, Slovenia, and the coastal region around Istria. Related: Illyrian.
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up (adj.)
c. 1300, "dwelling inland or upland," from up (adv.). Meaning "going up" is from 1784. From 1815 as "excited, exhilarated, happy," hence "enthusiastic, optimistic." Up-and-coming "promising" is from 1848. Musical up-tempo (adj.) is recorded from 1948.
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Galatians (n.)
Biblical epistle, from Galatia, name of an ancient inland region in Asia Minor, from Greek Galatia, based on Gaul, in reference to the Gaulish people who conquered the region and settled there 3c. B.C.E. In Latin Gallograeci, hence Middle English Gallocrecs "the Gallatians."
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Adriatic 
sea east of Italy, from Latin Adriaticus, properly Hadriaticus, from town of Atria/Hatria (modern Adria) in Picenum, near Venice, once a seaport but now more than 12 miles inland. The name is perhaps from atra, neuter of atrum "black," hence "the black city;" or else it represents Illyrian adur "water, sea."
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mocha (n.)

1773, "fine coffee," properly that produced in Yemen, from Mocha, Red Sea port of Yemen from which coffee was exported (the beans themselves grew further inland). Meaning "mixture of coffee and chocolate" is recorded by 1849. As a commercial name for a shade of dark brown, it is attested from 1895.

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