Etymology
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iniquity (n.)
c. 1300, "hostility, malevolence; a hostile action," from Old French iniquité, iniquiteit "wickedness; unfavorable situation" (12c.), from Latin iniquitatem (nominative iniquitas) "unequalness, unevenness," figuratively "unfavorableness, unfairness, injustice," noun of quality from iniquus "unjust, unequal; slanting, steep," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + aequus "just, equal" (see equal (adj.)).

For the vowel change in the Latin compound, see acquisition. Meaning "evil, wickedness" is from late 14c. Old Iniquity (1610s) was a comic or buffoonish character in old morality plays, representing vice.
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inequity (n.)
"unfairness," 1550s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + equity. Formed from the same elements as iniquity, but done in English. Related: Inequities.
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iniquitous (adj.)
"unjust wicked," 1670s, from iniquity + -ous. Earlier were iniquous (1650s, from Latin iniquus) and inique (1520s, from French inique). Related: Iniquitously; iniquitousness.
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reclamation (n.)

late 15c., reclamacion, "a revoking" (of a grant, etc.), from Old French réclamacion and directly from Latin reclamationem (nominative reclamatio) "a cry of 'no,' a shout of disapproval," noun of action from past participle stem of reclamare "cry out against, protest" (see reclaim). From 1630s as "action of calling (someone) back" (from iniquity, etc.); meaning "action of claiming as a possession something taken away" is from 1787. Of waste land from 1848; the notion is "action of subduing to fitness or use;" of used or waste material or objects, by 1937.

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mail-order (adj.)

1875, from mail (n.1) + order. Before television and the internet, the bane of retailers and shop-owners.

The origin, foundation and principle of mail order trading is universally recognized as wrong. It was conceived in iniquity and brought forth in despair as the world's greatest destructive medium. Mail Order Trading was born in the brain of knaves and thieves who fired their building for insurance profits, then sold the salvaged and damaged stock to the unsuspecting sons of man in distant territory. [Thomas J. Sullivan, "Merchants and Manufacturers on Trial," Chicago, 1914]
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den (n.1)

Old English denn "wild animal's lair, hollow place in the earth used by an animal for concealment, shelter, and security," from Proto-Germanic *danjan (source also of Middle Low German denne "lowland, wooded vale, den," Old English denu "valley," Old Frisian dene "down," Old High German tenni, German tenne "threshing floor," perhaps from a PIE word meaning "low ground").

Transferred to den-like places in human habitations in Middle English: "secret lurking place of thieves, place of retreat" (late 13c.); "apartment, private chamber" (late 14c.), but the modern use for "small room or lodging in which a man can seclude himself for work or leisure" [OED] is a modern development, originally colloquial, attested by 1771. By 1956, however, at least in U.S., the den had come to be a sort of family all-purpose room. In 19c. it also often had a bad sense, "a haunt, squalid place of retreat" (as in the set phrase den of iniquity for a brothel, etc.).

For, in truth, without a den or place of refuge, a man can achieve neither tranquility nor greatness. Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence in a quiet rooming house in Philadelphia. The soaring ideas that went into it evolved during hours of reading and contemplation in a secluded library. Had it been a study-TV-guest-family room, the United States might still be a colony. [The Kiplinger Magazine, September 1956]
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