Etymology
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inherent (adj.)
1570s, from Latin inhaerentem (nominative inhaerens), present participle of inhaerere "be closely connected with, be inherent," literally "adhere to, cling to," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + haerere "to adhere, stick" (see hesitation). Related: Inherently.
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inhesion (n.)
1630s, from Late Latin inhaesionem (nominative inhaesio) "a hanging or adhering to," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin inhaerere "to stick in or into" (see inherent).
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inherence (n.)

1570s, from French inhérence (15c.) or directly from Medieval Latin inhaerentia, from inhaerentem (see inherent). Related: Inherency (c. 1600).

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inhere (v.)
1580s, "to exist or have being" (in something), "belong to the intrinsic nature of," from Latin inhaerere "to stick in or to," also figurative (see inherent). Related: Inhered; inhering.
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potency (n.)

"power, inherent strength, ability to accomplish or effect," mid-15c., potencie, from Latin potentia "power," from potentem "potent," from potis "powerful, able, capable," from PIE root *poti- "powerful; lord." 

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inbred (adj.)
1590s, "native, produced within," also "inherent by nature," from in + bred. The genetic sense is attested from 1892 (see inbreeding).
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disability (n.)

1570s, "want of power, strength, or ability," from dis- + ability. Meaning "incapacity in the eyes of the law" is from 1640s. Related: Disabilities.

Disability implies deprivation or loss of power; inability indicates rather inherent want of power. [Century Dictionary]
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potent (adj.)

early 15c., "mighty, very powerful, possessed of inherent strength," from Latin potentem (nominative potens) "powerful," present participle of *potere "be powerful," from potis "powerful, able, capable; possible;" of persons, "better, preferable; chief, principal; strongest, foremost," from PIE root *poti- "powerful; lord." Meaning "having sexual power, capable of orgasm in sexual intercourse" (of men) is recorded by 1893.

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immanent (adj.)

"indwelling, remaining within, inherent," 1530s, via French immanent (14c.) or directly from Late Latin immanens, present participle of immanere "to dwell in, remain in," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + Latin manere "to dwell" (from PIE root *men- (3) "to remain"). In medieval philosophy contrasted with transitive; later with transcendent. Related: Immanently.

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abdication (n.)
Origin and meaning of abdication

1550s, "a disowning," from Latin abdicationem (nominative abdicatio) "voluntary renunciation, abdication," noun of action from past-participle stem of abdicare "disown, disavow, reject," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + dicare "proclaim" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly," and see diction). Sense of "resignation of inherent sovereignty" is from 1680s.

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