Etymology
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inhabit (v.)
late 14c., from Old French enhabiter, enabiter "dwell in, live in, reside" (12c.), from Latin inhabitare "to dwell in," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + habitare "to dwell," frequentative of habere "to hold, have" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). Formerly also enhabit. Related: Inhabited; inhabiting.
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uninhabited (adj.)
1570s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of inhabit (v.).
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inhabitant (n.)
"one who dwells in a place" (as distinguished from a visitor or transient), early 15c., from Anglo-French inhabitant, from Latin inhabitantem (nominative inhabitans), present participle of inhabitare "to dwell in" (see inhabit). Related: Inhabitants. As an adjective, also from early 15c.
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inhabitable (adj.)
1. "not habitable," late 14c., from Old French inhabitable (14c.), from Latin inhabitabilis, from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + habitabilis (see habitable).

2. "capable of being inhabited" (the main modern sense), c. 1600, from inhabit + -able). In Late Latin, inhabitabilis also was used in a sense of "that can be inhabited." A word used in two opposite senses.
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*ghabh- 
also *ghebh-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to give or receive." The basic sense of the root probably is "to hold," which can be either in offering or in taking.

It forms all or part of: able; avoirdupois; binnacle; cohabit; cohabitation; debenture; debit; debt; dishabille; due; duty; endeavor; exhibit; exhibition; forgive; gavel; gift; give; habeas corpus; habiliment; habit; habitable; habitant; habitat; habitation; habitual; habituate; habituation; habitude; habitue; inhabit; inhibit; inhibition; malady; prebend; prohibit; prohibition; provender.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit gabhasti- "hand, forearm;" Latin habere "to have, hold, possess," habitus "condition, demeanor, appearance, dress;" Old Irish gaibim "I take, hold, I have," gabal "act of taking;" Lithuanian gabana "armful," gabenti "to remove;" Gothic gabei "riches;" Old English giefan, Old Norse gefa "to give."
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populate (v.)

"to people, inhabit; form or furnish the population of a country, etc.," 1610s, from Medieval Latin populatus, past participle of populare "inhabit, to people," from Latin populus "inhabitants, people, nation" (see people (n.)). Earlier in English it was an adjective, "peopled, populated" (1570s). Related: Populated; populating.

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corticole (adj.)

"growing or living on the bark of trees," applied to lichens, fungi, 1851, from Latin cortic-, combining form of cortex "bark of a tree" (see corium) + colere "to inhabit" (see colony).

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lapidocolous (adj.)
of beetles, "living under stones," 1888, from Latin lapis "a stone" (see lapideous) + colus "inhabiting," from colere "to inhabit" (see colony).
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sanguicolous (adj.)

"living in the blood" (as a parasite does), by 1889, from Latin sanguis "blood" (see sanguinary) + colere "to inhabit" (see colony). Also, with classical stem, sanguinicolous.

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inquiline (n.)
1640s, "a lodger," from Latin inquilinus "an inhabitant of a place not his own," from *incolinus, from incola "an inhabitant," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + colere "inhabit, dwell" (see colony). Zoological sense of "animal living in the abode of another, a commensal" is from 1865.
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