Etymology
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ingrate (n.)

"ungrateful person," 1670s, from earlier adjective meaning "unfriendly," also "ungrateful, unthankful" (14c.), from Latin ingratus "unpleasant, disagreeable," also "ungrateful, unthankful," and "thankless, unprofitable," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + gratus "pleasing, beloved, dear, agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor").

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ingratitude (n.)
mid-14c., from Old French ingratitude "ungratefulness" (13c.) and directly from Late Latin ingratitudinem (nominative ingratitudo) "unthankfulness," noun of quality from Latin ingratus "ungrateful" (see ingrate).
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*gwere- (2)

gwerə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to favor."

It forms all or part of: agree; bard (n.); congratulate; congratulation; disgrace; grace; gracious; grateful; gratify; gratis; gratitude; gratuitous; gratuity; gratulation; ingrate; ingratiate.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit grnati "sings, praises, announces;" Avestan gar- "to praise;" Lithuanian giriu, girti "to praise, celebrate;" Old Celtic bardos "poet, singer."

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