Etymology
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informative (adj.)
1650s, "instructive, didactic," from Medieval Latin informativus, from Latin informatus, past participle of informare "to train, instruct, educate" (see inform). In Middle English, the same word meant "formative, shaping, plastic, having power to form or animate" (late 14c.). Related: Informatively.
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performative 

"of or pertaining to performance," 1955, adjective and noun, coined by British philosopher of language J.L. Austin (1911-1960), from perform + -ive, perhaps on model of informative.

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forthcoming (adj.)

late 15c., "about to happen or appear," present-participle adjective from Middle English forthcomen, from Old English forðcuman "to come forth, come to pass;" see forth + come (v.). Meaning "informative, responsive" is from 1835, via the notion of "in such a position or condition, as a person or a thing, that his or its presence when needed can be counted on." A once-common verb formation; English also had forthbring, forthcall, forthdo, forthgo, forthpass, forthset, all now obsolete.

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report (n.)

late 14c., "an account brought by one person to another; rumor, gossip," from Old French report "pronouncement, judgment" (Modern French rapport), from reporter "to tell, relate" (see report (v.)).

By early 15c. as "informative statement by a reputable source, authoritative account." In law, "formal account of a case argued and determined in court," by 1610s. The meaning "formal statement of results of an investigation" is attested by 1660s; sense of "teacher's official statement of a pupil's work and behavior" is from 1873 (report card in the school sense is attested by 1913, American English). The meaning "resounding noise, sound of an explosion or of the discharge of a firearm" is from 1580s.  

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