Etymology
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education (n.)
Origin and meaning of education

1530s, "child-rearing," also "the training of animals," from French education (14c.) and directly from Latin educationem (nominative educatio) "a rearing, training," noun of action from past-participle stem of educare (see educate). Originally of instruction in social codes and manners; meaning "systematic schooling and training for work" is from 1610s.

All education is despotism. [William Godwin, "Enquirer," 1797] 
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informal (adj.)

mid-15c., "lacking form; not in accordance with the rules of formal logic," from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + formal (adj.). Meaning "irregular, unofficial, not according to rule or custom" is from c. 1600. Sense of "done without ceremony" is from 1828. Related: Informally.

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co-education (n.)

also coeducation, "joint education," specifically of young men and young women in the same institution, 1852, from co- + education.

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maleducation (n.)

also mal-education, "imperfect or misdirected education," 1840, from mal- + education.

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tarp (n.)

1906, American English, informal shortening of tarpaulin.

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educationist (n.)

"one versed in the theory and practice of education," 1815; see education + -ist.

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scooch (v.)

by 1987, informal. Related: Scooched; scooching.

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miseducation (n.)

"wrong or faulty education," 1620s, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + education.

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Fulbright (n.)

in education, a reference to U.S. Sen. J. William Fulbright (1905-1995) of Arkansas, especially to the Fulbright Act of 1946, which authorized proceeds from sales of U.S. war surplus materials to be used to fund higher education overseas.

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