Etymology
Advertisement
informal (adj.)
mid-15c., "lacking form; not in accordance with the rules of formal logic," from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + formal (adj.). Meaning "irregular, unofficial, not according to rule or custom" is from c. 1600. Sense of "done without ceremony" is from 1828. Related: Informally.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
tarp (n.)
1906, American English, informal shortening of tarpaulin.
Related entries & more 
scooch (v.)
by 1987, informal. Related: Scooched; scooching.
Related entries & more 
Soviet Union 
informal name of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; in use in U.S. newspapers by October 1919.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cute (adj.)

1731, "clever, sharp, smart," shortening of acute; informal sense of "pretty" is by 1834, American English colloquial and student slang. Related: Cutely; cuteness.

Related entries & more 
paratransit (n.)

also para-transit, "public transportation of a flexible, informal kind" (such as taxis, carpools, etc.), 1973, from para- (1) + transit.

Related entries & more 
Star Wars (n.)
name of a popular science fiction film released in 1977; also the informal name for a space-based missile defense system proposed in 1983 by U.S. president Ronald Reagan.
Related entries & more 
talk (n.)
late 15c., "speech, discourse, conversation," from talk (v.). Meaning "informal lecture or address" is from 1859. Meaning "a subject of gossip" is from 1620s (in talk of the town). Talk show first recorded 1965; talk radio is from 1985.
Related entries & more 
whinge (v.)
"to complain peevishly," British, informal or dialectal, ultimately from the northern form of Old English hwinsian, from Proto-Germanic *hwinison (source also of Old High German winison, German winseln), from root of Old English hwinan "to whine" (see whine (v.)). Related: Whinged; whinging.
Related entries & more