Etymology
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inflame (v.)
mid-14c., "make (someone) ardent; set (the spirit, etc.) on fire" with a passion or religious virtue, a figurative sense, from Old French enflamer "catch fire; set on fire" (Modern French enflammer), from Latin inflammare "to set on fire, kindle," figuratively "to rouse, excite," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + flammare "to flame," from flamma "a flame" (see flame (n.)).

The literal sense of "to cause to burn" first recorded in English late 14c. Meaning "to heat, make hot, cause inflammation" is from 1520s. Formerly also enflame, but since 16c. the spelling with in- has predominated. Related: Inflamed; Inflaming.
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enflame (v.)
mid-14c.; see inflame. Related: Enflamed; enflaming.
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inflammatory (adj.)
"tending to rouse passions or desires," 1711, a figurative use from Latin inflammat-, past participle stem of inflammare "to set on fire" (see inflame) + -ory. From 1732 in pathology, "accompanied by (pathological) inflammation." as a noun from 1680s.
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inflammable (adj.)

"able to be set alight," c. 1600, from French inflammable, from Medieval Latin inflammabilis, from Latin inflammare "to set on fire" (see inflame).Since 1980s use of the word, especially in safety warnings, has been sometimes discouraged for fear it could be misunderstood as meaning "non-flammable" through confusion of the two prefixes in-. The word was used earlier in medicine in the sense "liable to inflammation" (early 15c.). Related: Inflammability.

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inflammation (n.)
early 15c., in pathology, "excessive redness or swelling in a body part," from Old French inflammation (14c.) and directly from Latin inflammationem (nominative inflammatio) "a kindling, a setting on fire," noun of action from past participle stem of inflammare "to set on fire" (see inflame). Literal sense "act of setting on fire" in English is from 1560s.
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*bhel- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to shine, flash, burn," also "shining white" and forming words for bright colors.

It forms all or part of: beluga; Beltane; black; blancmange; blanch; blank; blanket; blaze (n.1) "bright flame, fire;" bleach; bleak; blemish; blench; blende; blend; blind; blindfold; blitzkrieg; blond; blue (adj.1); blush; conflagration; deflagration; effulgence; effulgent; flagrant; flambe; flambeau; flamboyant; flame; flamingo; flammable; Flavian; Flavius; fulgent; fulminate; inflame; inflammable; phlegm; phlegmatic; phlogiston; phlox; purblind; refulgent; riboflavin.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit bhrajate "shines;" Greek phlegein "to burn;" Latin flamma "flame," fulmen "lightning," fulgere "to shine, flash," flagrare "to burn, blaze, glow;" Old Church Slavonic belu "white;" Lithuanian balnas "pale."

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impassion (v.)
1590s, "inflame with passion," from Italian impassionare "to fill with passion," from assimilated form of in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + passione "passion," from Latin passionem (see passion). Related: Impassioned; impassionable. Formerly also empassion.
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seismo- 
word-forming element meaning "earthquake," from Greek seismos "a shaking, shock; an earthquake," also "an extortion" (compare colloquial shake (someone) down), from seiein "to shake, agitate, sway; to quake, shiver" from PIE root *twei- "to agitate, shake, toss; excite; sparkle" (also source of Sanskrit tvesati "to excite; to be excited, inflame, sparkle," and Avestan words for "fears" and "fright, danger").
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combust (v.)

"to inflame, to burn," late 15c., from Latin combustus, past participle of combuere "to burn up, consume" (see combustion). "Now only jocular or affected" [OED]. Related: Combusted; combusting. Combust was used in Middle English from late 14c. as a past-participle adjective, "burnt," from Old French combust (14c.) and directly from Latin combustus. Also it was an astrological term for planets when near the sun.

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enamor (v.)

"to inflame with love, charm, captivate," c. 1300, from Old French enamorer "to fall in love with; to inspire love" (12c., Modern French enamourer), from en- "in, into" (see en- (1)) + amor "love," from amare "to love" (see Amy). Since earliest appearance in English, it has been used chiefly in the past participle (enamored) and with of or with. An equivalent formation to Provençal, Spanish, Portuguese enamorar, Italian innamorare.

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