Etymology
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infinity (n.)
late 14c., from Old French infinité "infinity; very large number or quantity" (13c.), from Latin infinitatem (nominative infinitas) "boundlessness, endlessness," from infinitus boundless, unlimited" (see infinite). Latin infinitas was used as a loan-translation of Greek apeiria "infinity," from apeiros "endless."
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"endlessly," Latin, literally "to infinity" from ad "to, unto" (see ad-) + infinitum "infinity," neuter accusative of adjective infinitus "endless" (see infinite). English version to infinity is attested from 1630s.
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immensity (n.)

mid-15c., immensite, "vastness; infinity," from Old French immensité (14c.) or directly from Latin immensitatem (nominative immensitas) "immeasurableness," noun of quality from immensus "immeasurable, boundless" (see immense). Immenseness is from c. 1600.

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endless (adj.)
Old English endeleas "boundless, eternal;" see end (n.) + -less. Compare Old Saxon endilos, Dutch eindeloos, German endlos. Related: Endlessly; endlessness. Old English used endeleasnes for "infinity, eternity."
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