Etymology
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infinitive (n.)
"simple, uninflected form of a verb, expressing its general sense," 1510s, from earlier use as an adjective (mid-15c.), from Late Latin infinitivus "unlimited, indefinite," from Latin infinitus "not limited" (see infinite). "Indefinite" because not restricted by person or number. Related: Infinitival; infinitively.
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ado (n.)
late 14c., "conflict, fighting; difficulty, trouble," a contraction of at do, literally "to do," a dialectal northern English formation in the Norse-influenced areas of England, as some Scandinavian languages used at with the infinitive of a verb where Modern English uses to. From use of the infinitive in much ado ("much to do") and similar phrases, ado came to be regarded as a noun. Compare the sense evolution in to-do and affair (from French infinitive phrase à faire "to do"). The weakened meaning "fuss" is from early 15c. Also used in Middle English for "dealings, traffic," and "sexual intercourse" (both c. 1400).
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disclaimer (n.)

"denial of a claim," mid-15c., from Anglo-French disclaimer "disavowal, denial," infinitive used as a noun in French (see disclaim). Compare waiver.

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render (n.2)

late 14c., rendre, a legal term, "act of yielding, giving, or restoring; a return, a payment," especially of rent; see render (v.). Probably at least in part from French noun use of the infinitive.

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bever (n.)
"drink," mid-15c.; "snack between meals," c. 1500, from Anglo-French beivre, Old French bevre, boivre, infinitive used as a noun, from Latin bibere "to imbibe" (from PIE root *po(i)- "to drink").
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surrender (n.)
early 15c., in law, "a giving up" (of an estate, land grant, interest in property, etc.), from Anglo-French surrendre, Old French surrendre noun use of infinitive, "give up, deliver over" (see surrender (v.)).
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outpouring (n.)

mid-15c., "a pouring out, outflow, effusion," from out- + infinitive of pour (v.). From 1757 as "action of pouring out," probably a re-coinage, originally transferred, of things spiritual; sense of "that which is poured out" (again, usually transferred) is from 1827. A verb, outpour "to pour forth," is attested from 1670s.

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esophagus (n.)
also oesophagus, late 14c., from Greek oisophagos "gullet, passage for food," literally "what carries and eats," from oisein, future infinitive of pherein "to carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry") + -phagos, from phagein "to eat" (from PIE root *bhag- "to share out, apportion; to get a share"). Related: Esophageal.
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remitter (n.)

mid-15c., a legal principle, "restoration of a prior or more valid title to certain property," from Old French remitter, noun use of infinitive, from Latin remittere "send back" (see remit). For legalese noun use of French infinitives, see waiver.

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waiver (n.)
"act of waiving," 1620s (modern usage is often short for waiver clause); from Anglo-French legal usage of infinitive as a noun (see waive). Baseball waivers is recorded from 1907. Other survivals of noun use of infinitives in Anglo-French legalese include disclaimer, merger, rejoinder, misnomer, ouster, retainer, attainder.
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