Etymology
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inferior (n.)
"person inferior to another in rank, etc.," early 15c., from inferior (adj.).
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inferior (adj.)
early 15c., of land, "low, lower down, lower in position," from Latin inferior "lower, farther down" (also used figuratively), comparative of inferus (adj.) "that is below or beneath," from infra "below" (see infra-). Meaning "lower in degree, rank, grade, or importance" is from 1530s; absolutely, "of low quality or rank," also from 1530s.
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inferiority (n.)

"state of being inferior," 1590s, probably from Medieval Latin *inferioritas; see inferior + -ity. Inferiority complex first attested 1919.

The surrender of life is nothing to sinking down into acknowledgment of inferiority. [John C. Calhoun, Senate debate, Feb. 19, 1847]
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puisne (adj.)

"junior, younger; inferior in rank," c. 1300 in Anglo-Latin, from Old French puisné "born later, younger, youngest" (see puny). As a noun from 1590s, "a junior, an inferior," especially "a judge of inferior rank."

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cull (n.1)

1610s, "a selection, something picked out," from cull (v.). From 1791 as "flock animal selected as inferior;" 1958 as "a killing of animals deemed inferior."

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backstreet (n.)
mid-15c., from back (adj.), here perhaps with a sense "inferior, mean, obscure" + street.
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subordinate (n.)
"one inferior in power, rank, office, etc.," 1630s, from subordinate (adj.).
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crappy (adj.)

"worthless, inferior, disgusting," 1846, from crap (n.) + -y (2). Related: Crappily; crappiness.

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glop (n.)
"inferior food," 1943, imitative of the sound of something unappetizingly viscous hitting a dinner plate.
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disparagement (n.)

late 15c., "a matching to one of inferior rank or condition," from Old French desparagement, from desparagier (see disparage). The older noun was simply disparage (mid-14c.), from Old French desparage. From 1590s as "injury by union or comparison with something of inferior excellence, act of depreciating, a lowering of the estimation or character" of a person or thing.

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