Etymology
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infect (v.)
late 14c., "fill with disease, render pestilential; pollute, contaminate; to corrupt morally," from Latin infectus, past participle of inficere "to stain, tinge, dye," also "to corrupt, stain, spoil," literally "to put in to, dip into," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + facere "to make, do, perform" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). In Middle English occasionally in a neutral sense "tinge, darken," but typically used of things indifferent or bad, and especially of disease. Related: Infected; infecting.
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infective (adj.)
"infectious, communicable by infection," late 14c., from Latin infectivus, from infect-, past participle stem of inficere "to tinge, dye; stain, spoil" (see infect).
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reinfect (v.)

also re-infect, "infect anew or again" (with disease, etc.), 1610s; see re- "back, again" + infect (v.). Related: Reinfected; reinfecting; reinfection.

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disinfect (v.)

"cleanse from infection, destroy the germs or disease in," 1590s, perhaps from French désinfecter (16c.), or formed in English from dis- + infect. Related: Disinfected; disinfecting.

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infection (n.)
late 14c., "infectious disease; contaminated condition;" from Old French infeccion "contamination, poisoning" (13c.) and directly from Late Latin infectionem (nominative infectio) "infection, contagion," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin inficere "to spoil, to stain" (see infect). Meaning "communication of disease by agency of air or water" (distinguished from contagion, which is body-to-body communication), is from 1540s.
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blow-fly (n.)
1720, from fly (n.) + blow (v.1) in an obsolete sense "to deposit eggs, to infect with eggs" (1550s), in reference to insects, "apparently connected with old notions of natural history" [OED].
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clap (n.2)

"gonorrhea," 1580s, of unknown origin, perhaps from Middle English clapper "rabbit-hole," from Old French clapoire (Modern French clapier), originally "rabbit burrow" (a word of uncertain origin), given a slang extension to "brothel" and also the name of a disease of some sort. In English originally also a verb, "to infect with clap." Related: Clap-doctor.

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affect (v.1)
"to make a mental impression on," 1630s; earlier "to attack" (c. 1600), "act upon, infect" (early 15c.), from affect (n.) or from Latin affectus "disposition, mood, state of mind or body produced by some external influence." Related: Affected; affecting. "The two verbs, with their derivatives, run into each other, and cannot be completely separated" [Century Dictionary].
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contaminate (v.)

early 15c., "infect with a disease, defile," from Latin contaminatus, past participle of contaminare "to defile, to corrupt, to deteriorate by mingling," originally "to bring into contact," from contamen "contact; pollution," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + *tag-, base of tangere "to touch" (from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle"). Related: Contaminant (1934).

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disease (v.)

mid-14c., disesen, "to make uneasy, trouble; inflict pain," a sense now obsolete; late 14c. as "to have an illness or infection;" late 15c. in the transitive sense of "to infect with a disease, make ill;" from disease (n.). Tyndale (1526) has Thy doughter is deed, disease not the master where KJV has trouble not (Luke viii.49).

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