Etymology
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inevitable (adj.)
"unavoidable," mid-15c., from Latin inevitabilis "unavoidable," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + evitabilis "avoidable," from evitare "to avoid," from ex "out" (see ex-) + vitare "shun," originally "go out of the way." As a noun from 1850. Related: Inevitableness.
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unevitable (adj.)
from un- (1) "not" + evitable. The usual word is inevitable. Related: Unevitably.
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inevitability (n.)
1640s, from inevitable + -ity. Perhaps modeled on French inévitabilité.
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evitable (adj.)
c. 1500, from Latin evitabilis "avoidable," from evitare "to shun, avoid" (see inevitable). In modern use, likely a back-formation from inevitable.
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fatalist (n.)
1640s, adherent of the philosophical doctrine that all things are determined by fate; from fatal + -ist. General sense of "one who accepts every condition and event as inevitable" is from 1734.
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cornered (adj.)

late 14c., "having corners," past-participle adjective from corner (v.). Figurative sense "forced or driven into a position where surrender or defeat is inevitable" is from 1824.

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ineluctable (adj.)
"not to be escaped by struggling," 1620s, from French inéluctable (15c.) or directly from Latin ineluctabilis "unavoidable, inevitable," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + eluctabilis "that may be escaped from," from eluctari "to struggle out of," from ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + luctari "to struggle" (see reluctance).
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corner (v.)

late 14c., "to furnish with corners; bring to a point by convergence," from corner (n.). Meaning "to turn a corner," as in a race, is from 1860s. Meaning "drive or force (someone) into a corner," also figuratively, "force into a position where defeat or surrender is inevitable," is American English from 1824; commercial sense "monopolize the market supply of a stock or commodity" is from 1836. Related: Cornered; cornering.

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fatalism (n.)

1670s as a philosophical doctrine that all things are determined by fate, from fatal + -ism. Meaning "disposition to accept all conditions and events as inevitable" is from 1734.

Fatalism is a doctrine which does not recognize the determination of all events by causes, in the ordinary sense; holding, on the contrary, that a certain foreordained result will come about, no matter what may be done to prevent it. Fatalism is thus directly opposed to necessitarianism, according to which every event is determined by the events which immediately precede it in a mechanical way. [Century Dictionary]
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