Etymology
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industrial (adj.)
1774, "resulting from labor," from French industriel, from Medieval Latin industrialis, from Latin industria "diligence, activity" (see industry). There is an isolated earlier used in the same sense from 1580s, from Latin industria.

The main modern meaning "pertaining to the manufacture of commodities, connected with the application of industry to manufactures" is from 1830, from a sense in French.

Meaning "suitable for industrial use" is from 1904. As a style of dance music, attested from 1988. Industrial revolution was in use by 1840 to refer to what were then recent developments and changes in England and elsewhere.
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industrialism (n.)
1831, from industrial + -ism. Probably modeled on French industrialisme (Saint-Simon, 1823).
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industrialist (n.)
1846, from industrial + -ist. Perhaps modeled on French industrialiste (Saint-Simon, 1823). Earlier "one who makes a living by productive industry" (1837).
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industrialize (v.)
1852, from industrial + -ize. Probably modeled on French industrialiser (1842). Related: Industrialized; industrializing.
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industrious (adj.)

1550s, "characterized by energy, effort, and attention; marked by industry," from French industrieux (c. 1500) and directly from Late Latin industriosus, from Latin industria "diligence, activity" (see industry). Of persons, "given to industry, working diligently," 1590s. It retains the etymological sense of the Latin word while industrial serves in the modern senses. Related: Industriously; industriousness.

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throughput (n.)
"energy, activity," 1808, Scottish slang; from through + put. Industrial sense is from 1915.
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Wobbly (n.)
1914, member of Industrial Workers of the World (I.W.W.). Probably some sort of elaboration of the W aspect of the acronym.
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lant (n.)
"stale urine used for industrial purposes, chamber-lye," Old English hland.
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brownfield (n.)
abandoned or disused industrial land, often contaminated to some degree, 1992, American English, from brown (adj.) + field (n.).
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revolving (adj.)

"making revolutions, rotating," 1690s, present-participle adjective from revolve (v.). Revolving door is attested from 1856 in industrial processes, 1896 in buildings.

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