Etymology
Advertisement
indulge (v.)
formerly also endulge, 1630s, "to grant as a favor;" 1650s, "to treat with unearned favor" (in reference both to persons and desires), a back-formation from indulgence (q.v.), or directly from Latin indulgere "be complaisant, be indulgent, yield; give oneself up to." Related: Indulged; indulging; indulgingly.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
overindulge (v.)

also over-indulge, "indulge to excess," 1690s, from over- + indulge. Related: Overindulged; overindulging.

Related entries & more 
luxuriate (v.)
1620s, "grow exuberantly or in abundance," also "indulge in luxury," from Latin luxuriatus, past participle of luxuriare "have to excess," figuratively "run riot, be dissolute, indulge to excess," from luxuria "excess, rankness, luxuriance" (see luxury). Related: Luxuriated; luxuriating.
Related entries & more 
surfeit (v.)
late 14c., intransitive, "indulge or feed to excess," from surfeit (n.). Related: Surfeited; surfeiting. Transitive sense from 1590s.
Related entries & more 
doll (v.)

1867, in dialect, "to pet, indulge" (a child), from doll (n.). Usually with up. Meaning "to dress (up)" is by 1906, American English. Related: Dolled; dolling.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
lecherous (adj.)

"prone to indulge in sensuality, lustful, lewd," c. 1300, probably from lecher + -ous; or else from rare Old French adjective lecheros. The nativized form is lickerish. Related: Lecherously; lecherousness.

Related entries & more 
pander (v.)

"to indulge (another), to minister to base passions, cater for the lusts of others," c. 1600, from pander (n.). Meaning "to minister to others' prejudices for selfish ends" is from c. 1600. Related: Pandered; panderer; pandering.

Related entries & more 
favor (v.)
mid-14c., "to regard with favor, indulge, treat with partiality," from Old French favorer, from favor "a favor, partiality" (see favor (n.)). Meaning "to resemble, look somewhat like" is from c. 1600. Related: Favored; favoring.
Related entries & more 
hoyden (n.)
"ill-bred, boisterous young female," 1670s; earlier "rude, boorish fellow" (1590s), of uncertain origin; perhaps from Dutch heiden "rustic, uncivilized man," from Middle Dutch heiden "heathen," from Proto-Germanic *haithinaz- (see heathen). OED points to Elizabethan hoit "indulge in riotous and noisy mirth" in Nares.
Related entries & more 
prolix (adj.)

early 15c., of writing, etc., "lengthy, protracted, long and wordy," from Old French prolixe (13c.) and directly from Latin prolixus "extended, stretched out" (of hair, tails, etc., in Late Latin of speech), etymologically "poured out," from pro "forth" (see pro-) + base of liquere "to flow" (see liquid (adj.)).

Of persons, "long-winded, prone to indulge in lengthy discourse," 1520s.

Related entries & more