Etymology
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Bali 
island in the Indonesian archipelago, of unknown origin. Related: Balinese.
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satay (n.)

Indonesian dish consisting of spicy bits or balls of meat grilled or barbecued on skewers, a popular street food, 1934, from Malay or Javanese (Austronesian) satai.

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Indonesia 

"the East Indies," 1850, from Indo- "India" + Greek nēsos "island" (see Chersonese) + -ia. Formerly called Indian Archipelago or East Indies Islands (see Indies). Related: Indonesian "of or from the East Indies" (1850).

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bantam (n.)

1749, after Bantam, former Dutch residency in Java, from which the small domestic fowl were said to have been first imported. Extension to "small person" is 1837. As a light weight class in boxing, it is attested from 1884, probably from the birds, which are small but aggressive and bred for fighting. The Indonesian Bantam, also called Banten, has a name of unknown origin, probably from a local language.

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anti-macassar (n.)
also antimacassar, 1848, from anti- + macassar oil, supposedly imported from the district of Macassar on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, which was commercially advertised from 1809 as a men's hair tonic "infallible in promoting an abundant growth and in maintaining the early hue and lustre of the HAIR to the extent of human life" [1830]. The cloth was laid to protect chair and sofa fabric from men leaning their oily heads back against it.
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