Etymology
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indiscriminate (adj.)
"not carefully discriminating, done without making distinctions," 1640s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + discriminate (adj.).
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guess (n.)
c. 1300, "indiscriminate conclusion, guesswork, doubtful supposition," from guess (v.). Mid-15c. as "considered opinion." Verbal shrug phrase your guess is as good as mine attested from 1902.
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promiscuous (adj.)

c. 1600, of people or things, "mingled confusedly or indiscriminately, consisting of parts or individuals grouped together without order, consisting of a disorderly mix," from Latin promiscuus "mixed, indiscriminate, in common, without distinction, to which all are admitted without distinction," from pro (see pro-) + miscere "to mix" (from PIE root *meik- "to mix").

Meaning "indiscriminate in sexual relations" is recorded by 1857, from promiscuity in the related sense, the meaning then shading into "not restricted to one individual." The Latin adjective also was used sexually, with conubia (of sexual union between patricians and plebeians). Related: Promiscuously; promiscuousness.

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promiscuity (n.)

1834, "indiscriminate mixture, confusion," from French promiscuité (1752), from Latin promiscuus "mixed, not separated" (see promiscuous) + French -ité (see -ity). By 1844 in the sense of "promiscuous sexual union" (originally as among races of people). An earlier word was promiscuousness (by 1773 general; 1808 sexual).

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massacre (n.)

"unnecessary, indiscriminate killing of human beings," sometimes also applied to wholesale slaughter of animals, 1580s, from French massacre "wholesale slaughter, carnage," from Old French macacre, macecle "slaughterhouse; butchery, slaughter," which is of unknown origin; perhaps related to Latin macellum "provisions store, butcher shop," which probably is related to mactāre "to kill, slaughter."

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pell-mell (adv.)

"confusedly; in an impetuous rush; with indiscriminate violence, energy, or eagerness," 1570s, from French pêle-mêle, from Old French pesle mesle (12c.), apparently a jingling rhyme on the second element, which is from the stem of the verb mesler "to mix, mingle" (see meddle). The phonetic form pelly melly is attested in English from mid-15c.

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hackneyed (adj.)
"trite, so overused as to have become uninteresting," 1749, figurative use of past-participle adjective from hackney (v.) "use a horse for riding" (1570s), hence "make common by indiscriminate use" (1590s), from hackney (n.), and compare hack (n.2) in its specialized sense of "one who writes anything for hire." From 1769 as "kept for hire."
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prostitute (v.)
Origin and meaning of prostitute

1520s, "to offer to indiscriminate sexual intercourse" (usually in exchange for money), from Latin prostitutus, past participle of prostituere, etymologically "place before or in front," hence "expose publicly," and especially "expose to prostitution."

This is from pro "before" (see pro-) + statuere "cause to stand, establish" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm"). Related: Prostituted; prostituting. Figurative sense of "surrender to any vile or infamous purpose" (of abilities, etc.) is implied from 1570s.

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pica (n.2)

"pathological craving for substance unfit for food" (such as chalk), 1560s, from Medieval Latin pica "magpie" (see pie (n.2)), probably translating Greek kissa, kitta "magpie, jay," also "false appetite." The connecting notion may be the birds' indiscriminate feeding. Compare geophagy.

As the magpie eats young birds, here is the bird to keep the sparrows' numbers in check, for it will live in towns and close to dwellings—just the localities sparrows frequent. The magpie's appetite is omnivorous, and it is charged with at times killing weakly lambs, and varying its diet by partaking of grain and fruit; but I never at Home heard any complaints of this bird from the farmers, whilst the gamekeepers had not a good word for it. The bird will eat carrion, so if one were disturbed taking a meal from a dead lamb it would probably be blamed for its death, which may have occurred from natural causes. [A. Bathgate, "The Sparrow Plague and its Remedy," in Transactions of the New Zealand Institute, 1903]
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