Etymology
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indiscreet (adj.)
"imprudent, not discrete, lacking good judgment," early 15c., from Medieval Latin indiscretus, from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Latin discretus "separated, distinct" (in Medieval Latin "discerning, careful"), past participle of discernere "distinguish" (see discern). A Medieval Latin secondary sense of the word that also became indiscrete. Related: Indiscreetly; indiscreetness.
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temerarious (adj.)
"rash, reckless," 1530s, from Latin temerarius "rash, heedless, thoughtless, indiscreet," from temere "blindly, rashly, by chance" (see temerity). Related: Temerariously; temerariousness.
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fondly (adj.)
mid-14c., "foolishly," from fond + -ly (2). Formerly sometimes in a bad sense, "with indiscreet or excessive affection" (1762). Meaning "affectionately" is from 1590s.
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inconsiderate (adj.)
late 15c., "done thoughtlessly, heedless, careless, indiscreet," from Latin inconsideratus "headstrong, unadvised," of persons, "thoughtless," literally "not properly considered," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + consideratus (see consider). Sense of "without regard for the feelings of others" is from 1842. Related: Inconsiderately.
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indiscretion (n.)
mid-14c., "want of discretion, imprudence," from Old French indiscrecion "foolishness, imprudence" (12c.), from Late Latin indiscretionem (nominative indiscretio) "lack of discernment," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + discretionem "discernment, power to make distinctions" (see discretion). Meaning "indiscreet act" is from c. 1600.
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innuendo (n.)
"oblique hint, indiscreet suggestion," usually a deprecatory one, 1670s, from Latin innuendo "by meaning, pointing to," literally "giving a nod to," ablative of gerund of innuere "to mean, signify," literally "to nod to," from in- "at" (from PIE root *en "in") + nuere "to nod" (see numinous).

Originally in English a legal phrase (1560s) from Medieval Latin, with the sense of "to wit," introducing an explanatory or parenthetical clause, it also introduced the derogatory meaning alleged in libel cases, which led to broader meaning. As a verb, from 1706.
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