Etymology
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indirect (adj.)
late 14c., from Old French indirect (14c.) or directly from Late Latin indirectus "not direct," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + directus (see direct (adj.)). Related: Indirectness.
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indirection (n.)
"irregular means, deceitful action," 1590s, from indirect + -ion.
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hint (v.)
1640s, "suggest in an indirect manner," from hint (n.). Related: Hinted; hinting.
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backhanded (adj.)
1765, "done with the hand turned backward," from backhand (q.v.). Figurative sense "oblique in meaning, indirect; ambivalent, sarcastic," is from 1777. Related: Backhandedly; backhandedness.
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circuitous (adj.)

"going round in a circuit, indirect," 1660s, from Medieval Latin circuitus "full of roundabout ways," from Latin circuitus "a going round" (see circuit (n.)). Related: Circuitously; circuitousness.

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dative (adj., n.)

mid-15c., in grammar, the case of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives denoting an indirect object of the action of the verb, from Latin dativus "pertaining to giving," from datus "given" (from PIE root *do- "to give"); in grammatical use from Greek dotikē (ptōsis) "dative (case)," from dotikos "of giving nature," from dotos "given" (from the same PIE root as the Latin word).

The notion is of the case that belongs to giving or commanding. Typically the case of the indirect object, but sometimes also denoting "motion toward." In old Germanic languages, the "fourth case," catch-all for Indo-European dative, ablative, locative, and other cases. In law, "that may be disposed of at pleasure," from 1530s.

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obliquity (n.)

early 15c., obliquite, "state of being slanted or twisted; crookedness (of eyes), also figurative, "moral transgression," from Old French obliquité (14c.), from Latin obliquitatem (nominative obliquitas) "slanting direction, obliquity," noun of quality from obliquus "slanting, sidelong, indirect" (see oblique).

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insinuation (n.)

1520s, "act of making an indirect suggestion;" 1530s, "that which is indirectly suggested," from French insinuation (16c.) or directly from Latin insinuationem (nominative insinuatio) "entrance through a narrow way; an ingratiating oneself," noun of action from past-participle stem of insinuare "creep in, intrude, wind one's way into" (see insinuate).

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backhand (adj.)
1690s, "having the hand turned backward;" see back (adv.) + hand (n.). By 1894 in reference to handwriting that flows at a back-slant. As a verb, by 1857. As a noun, in reference to tennis, 1890, short for backhand stroke or volley. The figurative adjectival sense of "indirect" is from c. 1800. Related: Backhanded; backhanding.
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