Etymology
Advertisement
indignation (n.)
c. 1200, from Old French indignacion "fury, rage; disrespect," or directly from Latin indignationem (nominative indignatio) "indignation, displeasure; a provocation, cause for indignation," noun of action from past participle stem of indignari "regard as unworthy, be angry or displeased at," from indignus "unworthy," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + dignus "worth (n.), worthy, proper, fitting," from PIE *dek-no-, suffixed form of root *dek- "to take, accept." The indignation meeting (1835) once was a common American way to express popular outrage by passing and publishing resolutions.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
*dek- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to take, accept."

It forms all or part of: condign; dainty; decent; decor; decorate; decorous; deign; dignify; dignity; diplodocus; disciple; discipline; disdain; docent; Docetism; docile; docimacy; doctor; doctrine; document; dogma; dogmatic; doxology; heterodox; indignance; indignant; indignation; indignity; orthodox; paradox; synecdoche.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit daśasyati "shows honor, is gracious," dacati "makes offerings, bestows;" Greek dokein "to appear, seem, think," dekhesthai "to accept;" Latin decere "to be fitting or suitable," docere "to teach," decus "grace, ornament."
Related entries & more 
saeva indignatio 

Latin phrase from Swift's epitaph; "savage indignation;" an intense feeling of contemptuous anger at human folly.

Related entries & more 
repressible (adj.)

"capable of being restrained," 1801, of emotions and indignation or of medical conditions, but if the former almost always qualified by hardly, no longer, barely, etc.; see repress (v.) + -ible. Also compare irrepressible.

Related entries & more 
outcry (n.)

mid-14c., "act of crying aloud, a loud or vehement clamor," especially of indignation or distress, from out (adv.) + cry (v.). In metaphoric sense of "public protest," it is attested by 1911 in George Bernard Shaw.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
shocking (adj.)
1690s, "offensive," present-participle adjective from shock (v.1). From 1704 as "causing a jolt of indignation, horror, etc.;" from 1798 as "so bad as to be shocking." Related: Shockingly. Shocking pink introduced February 1937 by Italian-born fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli.
Related entries & more 
stomach (v.)
"tolerate, put up with," 1570s, from stomach (n.), probably in reference to digestion; earlier sense was opposite: "to be offended at, resent" (1520s), echoing Latin stomachari "to be resentful, be irritated, be angry," from stomachus (n.) in its secondary sense of "pride, indignation." Related: Stomached; stomaching.
Related entries & more 
nemesis 

1570s, Nemesis, "Greek goddess of vengeance, personification of divine wrath," from Greek nemesis "just indignation, righteous anger," literally "distribution" (of what is due), related to nemein "distribute, allot, apportion one's due," from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take." The notion is "divine allotment to everyone of his share of fortune, good or bad." With a lower-case -n-, in the sense of "retributive justice," attested from 1590s. General sense of "anything by which it seems one must be defeated" is by 1930.

Related entries & more 
huff (v.)
mid-15c., apparently imitative of forcible exhaling. Extended sense of "to bluster with arrogance or indignation" is attested from 1590s. Related: Huffed; huffing. As a slang term for a type of narcotics abuse, by 1996. Huff cap was 17c. slang for "swaggerer, blusterer" (i.e., one with an inflated head), and was noted in 1577 among the popular terms for "strong beer or ale" (with mad dog and dragon's milk), probably because it goes to the head and huffs one's cap.
Related entries & more 
*nem- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "assign, allot; take."

It forms all or part of: agronomy; anomie; anomy; antinomian; antinomy; astronomer; astronomy; autonomous; autonomy; benumb; Deuteronomy; economy; enumerate; enumeration; gastronomy; heteronomy; innumerable; metronome; namaste; nemesis; nimble; nim; nomad; nomothetic; numb; numeracy; numeral; numerator; numerical; numerology; numerous; numismatic; supernumerary; taxonomy.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek nemein "to deal out," nemesis "just indignation;" Latin numerus "number;" Lithuanian nuoma "rent, interest;" Middle Irish nos "custom, usage;" German nehmen "to take."
Related entries & more